6 unit development Melbourne

Hi All,

I have recently become a member and this is my first thread.

A little about myself. I graduated a year ago with a Civil Engineering degree and currently working for a transport engineering firm. I have plans to move back into structural/civil and potentially get a builders license .

I'm excited to learn from all the experienced developers/investors and I look forward to meeting you all.

My first project is in the West of Melbourne and the architect has been able to fit 6 double storey, 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom, reversed living town houses.

The land size is 740m^2 and each town house is roughly 130m^2 (including balcony and garage)

My questions are:

1. Is 130m^2 too tight?
2. Should I have a bath tub? Without it I can put the toilet in the bathroom and use that extra space for storage maybe.
3. Do you think I need a town planner?
4. Do you think I need a project manager?

Look forward to reading your replies. Anything will be helpful =).

Cheers,

Derrick
 
1) for a 2x2? Not at all.
2) check your market for smaller families. If you're targeting the upper end, then definitely need a tub.
3) Yes.
4) Maybe - depends if it's a design and construct / doc and construct contract with a builder or builder/architect combo or not.
 
Definately not in Brimbank, I barely fit 3 on 697sqm and that was pushing their planning scheme so I'd be super surprised to know which council will allow 6 on 740sqm.
 
Definately not in Brimbank, I barely fit 3 on 697sqm and that was pushing their planning scheme so I'd be super surprised to know which council will allow 6 on 740sqm.

More your design than council as well as the particular block.

4 on 697m2 is simple, especially with Brimbank.
 
Hi All,

I have recently become a member and this is my first thread.

A little about myself. I graduated a year ago with a Civil Engineering degree and currently working for a transport engineering firm. I have plans to move back into structural/civil and potentially get a builders license .

I'm excited to learn from all the experienced developers/investors and I look forward to meeting you all.

My first project is in the West of Melbourne and the architect has been able to fit 6 double storey, 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom, reversed living town houses.

The land size is 740m^2 and each town house is roughly 130m^2 (including balcony and garage)

My questions are:

1. Is 130m^2 too tight?
2. Should I have a bath tub? Without it I can put the toilet in the bathroom and use that extra space for storage maybe.
3. Do you think I need a town planner?
4. Do you think I need a project manager?

Look forward to reading your replies. Anything will be helpful =).

Cheers,

Derrick

1. Agree with previous poster, 130m2 allotment size is not too small for a 2bedder. We've got one at the moment which are on 92m2 and they are 2 bedroom townhouses. Not a 'spacious' townhouse but with clever design it can turn out quite well.
2. Research the target market. If its primarily young families then yes it would be ideal (you could even have one of those half bath tubs these days - ie. not a full length one). If its young professionals then you could probably do without it as they're usually the ones that might not yet have kids and when they do decide to start a family they might consider moving into something else. I don't think a bathtub (not having one) has ever been a deal breaker for us so i would go without the bath-tub and aim for a 2nd toilet instead or utilise the space for storage which is always lacking in these dog box type homes :)
3. The only time we use a town planner/planning consultant is if the development isn't quite fully complying and there are obstacles to overcome in either meeting the development plan objectives or other planning related issues. If its pretty well a complying development in that you meet all the requirements then save your money and do it yourself (unless you aren't comfortable in doing so of course).
4. You don't need a project manager, all you need is to engage in the various consultant/services required in such a development and let the experts do their jobs. So in something like this, you would need a draftsman/archi to come up with the plans, Surveyor for the land division, engineer for site drainage plans, soil report, footing construction report, footing inspections etc, builder who pretty much manages the construction side of things until handover, conveyancer for the land division and possibly someone to do your 6 star energy efficiency report (may not be a requirement where you are).
 
How can you fit 6 town houses on a 740m2 site?

Not in Brimbank. Maybe Hobsons Bay Council?

8sqm balcony as open space requirement is the key.

Reverse living will sell less and it is harder to sell. Can you squeeze in 5 normal ones?

Calling oc1...

Hi guys,

The property is actually within the brimbank council. And you are right Evan1875, because it is in a residential growth zone the balcony can be considered open space. and high density build is supported.

5 can be squeezed in comfortably, but 6 is pushing the boundaries abit. The reason I have a bit of confidence though is that the architect im using has had a 7 on 800m^2 approved and now in the final stages of advertising.

thanks for your input
 
1. Agree with previous poster, 130m2 allotment size is not too small for a 2bedder. We've got one at the moment which are on 92m2 and they are 2 bedroom townhouses. Not a 'spacious' townhouse but with clever design it can turn out quite well.
2. Research the target market. If its primarily young families then yes it would be ideal (you could even have one of those half bath tubs these days - ie. not a full length one). If its young professionals then you could probably do without it as they're usually the ones that might not yet have kids and when they do decide to start a family they might consider moving into something else. I don't think a bathtub (not having one) has ever been a deal breaker for us so i would go without the bath-tub and aim for a 2nd toilet instead or utilise the space for storage which is always lacking in these dog box type homes :)
3. The only time we use a town planner/planning consultant is if the development isn't quite fully complying and there are obstacles to overcome in either meeting the development plan objectives or other planning related issues. If its pretty well a complying development in that you meet all the requirements then save your money and do it yourself (unless you aren't comfortable in doing so of course).
4. You don't need a project manager, all you need is to engage in the various consultant/services required in such a development and let the experts do their jobs. So in something like this, you would need a draftsman/archi to come up with the plans, Surveyor for the land division, engineer for site drainage plans, soil report, footing construction report, footing inspections etc, builder who pretty much manages the construction side of things until handover, conveyancer for the land division and possibly someone to do your 6 star energy efficiency report (may not be a requirement where you are).

Hi Mamaof3,

Thanks for your great input.
2. Other than the census and suburb profile is there any other ways to find out these details?

3. So you recommend getting a town planner only when issues arise? e.g the council rejects the 6 units or request significant changes? I can see the importance of having one especially considering its my first project. However it is not an insignificant costs and given my architect has a similar project approved i might get away with not having one?

4. I am definitely willing to manage the project myself and I understand the steps involved, but again being my first investment/project i dont want to make any stupid mistakes or overlook anything. Hopefully through my continuous research and from the advice given from the more experienced, i avoid any crippling mistakes.
 
I can't see the benefit in a town planner for you. Sounds like you have a gun architect who's been able to push the boundaries in the council that you're looking to deal with. What more do you expect to gain from employing a town planner? I think you're already past that stage, you have 5 as a back up and are pushing for 6.
 
I can't see the benefit in a town planner for you. Sounds like you have a gun architect who's been able to push the boundaries in the council that you're looking to deal with. What more do you expect to gain from employing a town planner? I think you're already past that stage, you have 5 as a back up and are pushing for 6.

Thanks Brady, I think I will be ok without one.
 
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