Adams renovation with photos

From: Adam Randall


Here is the after, and cost breakdown
Tasmanian beech $75 Bunnings
laminate Primer $27
Ronseal paint and grain $39 (on special)
Handles $120 Handles plus
mouldings @$120
7008 2 part gloss $33
crystal clear gloss
(for cupboards) $20
 
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Reply: 1
From: Denise Macadam


Adam,
Photos!!! - yahoo and thanks
Looks great - now, do tell how you did this for $500.00 and was it all done by your good self? What a difference, your own house or an ip?
Well done
Denise
 
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Reply: 1.1
From: J Parker


Looks great Adam- well done!
The kitchen cupboards look terrific using that laminate paint- I've used the WK one myself with terrific results.
I also like the way you repainted the exposed beams white- adds a lot of light doing this.
Some questions, though, for those of us who are curious and not great at kitchen restorations! :)

1. It appears that you put laminate on top of the existing benchtops? Is this the same stuff that is used on floors (referred to as floating flooring) or a special one specially made for benchtops?

2. What did you use for the edges of the benchtops?

3. When you put the new handles in did you have to putty the old holes up first?

4. Lastly, did you install the benchtops yourself? This would be one of the jobs that someone such as myself couldn't do, so it would add to my cost. Would love to know how you did it!

Once again, well done and thanks for sharing before and after photos- I love seeing other people's renovation pics up here! When I learn how to do it, I might even put some of my own up!
Cheers, Jacque :)
 
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A

Anonymous

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Reply: 2
From: Anonymous


I quite liked the kitchen before, must have been the mission brown and heritage green colors in my bedroom as a kid.

No seriously, how much investment value has the reno added to a)your portfolio b)your cashflow ????

Estimates?
 
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Reply: 3
From: Adam Randall


Hello
I will answer the questions the best I can.

1. It appears that you put laminate on top of the existing benchtops? Is this the same stuff that is used on floors (referred to as floating flooring) or a special one specially made for benchtops?
answer: That is real timber (Tasmainian Beech) laid over the top of the original laminate. They are meant for use on floors (parquetry), I laid each block of wood individually, took me an evening to do. The sanding was a differrent story, that took about a week to get nice and smooth (about 20 hours). I started with a belt sander and finished with a random orbital (bosch pxe400 very nice). I used special PVA glue, and on top I used a 2 pack gloss (wattyl 7008) for a hard wearing high gloss finish. Don't kid yourself, most people could achieve this, I find the hardest thing is getting everything flat, and the angles right, I also tend to rush so I can see the final result, problem is when I rush, I alsways stuff something up and it takes me twice as long anyway.

2. What did you use for the edges of the benchtops?
answer: Mouldings from bunnings, I then stained them with mahogany stain (craftsman), I haven't glossed them yet.

3. When you put the new handles in did you have to putty the old holes up first?
Answer: luckily not on the cupboards, I just used the original hole as the top hole for the new handles. This saved time because I new they were all exact, I just created a template that I aligned to the original hole and top corner to drill the second hole.
The hole in the drawers had to be filled up, as they were located in the centre

4. Lastly, did you install the benchtops yourself? This would be one of the jobs that someone such as myself couldn't do, so it would add to my cost. Would love to know how you did it!
answer: yes I did the benchtops myself, never done them before either. Additionally My Mum nearly had a nervous breakdown when she saw that I had pulled the original kitchen apart, I think she has more faith in me now.

The house is a rental property in Adelaide (Skye), before I started (FEB) I was getting about $400 a week, probably won't get to much more now, but It will not sit vacant as often being it appeals to more people now.
The biggest killer for me is I have lost out on that $400 a week for 6 months (2 french doors a week).

Made the mistake of getting a valuer in after 98.5 % of the renovation has been completed, this was also while the kitchen was in bits, he took 1 look at the rubbish on the floor and took 50K of the value. Told me he could only value it on its present state, and because it wasn't finished only investors would be interested in it if the bank had to sell it tommorow.
Value currently is 300K. I find it hard to believe even in Adelaide that a 280sqm house on 2 1/2 acres 15 mins to town is only worth 300K even if it is very messy at the moment.
 
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Reply: 4
From: Adam Randall


Also
Someone on the forum said the Ronseal paint and grain did not cover up dark colours very well. Taking this in I bought a can of WK white primer (very good hiding ability), and used this as the first coat, then did 2 coats of ronseal undercoat, followed by the grain coat, whoever said that saved me alot of work, as the ronseal undercoat is very watery, and dark colours show through easily.
Also to Duncan and other power tool freaks note the rechargable whipper snipper in the photo (very nice).
For some reason the photos will not pick up the graining effect, but it is very immpressive.
Anyone in the Adelaide area wants to see the place email me.
Adam
 
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Reply: 4.1
From: Duncan M




> Also to Duncan and other power tool freaks note the
> rechargable whipper snipper in the photo (very nice).

Saw that :) But <ugh ugh> give me a smelly smoke-belching two stroke petrol
model anyday :)


Regards, Duncan.
 
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Reply: 4.1.1
From: Natasha Popovic


Wow! That looks excellent! I am thinking of doing a little kitchen renovating myself and this has given me some motivation. One tip I would give though is a bit of white tile paint to cover up the dated feature tiles ( or replace these tiles) as they reveal the age of the kitchen.

Looks great though!
 
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