Bath Repaint

From: Aaron Dwyer


Reno question.

I need to paint the bath and vanity basin to get it white instead of 70's lime/yellow.

I've picked up some Tub'N'Tile from WhiteKnight, but before I use it I thought I'd ask if anyone has used it before?? Successful??? Yes / No.

I remember seeing something on the TV about a company that does this sort of thing. I am in Brisbane. I think they painted tiles as well. Can anyone give me any clues.??

Thanks
--
Aaron Dwyer
Freestyler (yellow belt)
~ To know and not to do, is really not to know at all.
 
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Reply: 1
From: Rachel Freedman


Hi Aaron
I have used this product to re-do our tiled floor which was 70's brown. We needed two coats - don't be afraid to apply it thickly it seems to look better. We have only had it done for a couple of months but I do not see any signs of wear yet so I am pretty happy with it. You can use a different cheaper product for tiles on walls (also by WhiteKnight) as TubnTile costs $50 a pop - still cheaper than re-tiling floors although limited in colours (white/vanilla).
Regards

Rachel
Canberra Freestyler Coordinator
 
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Reply: 1.1
From: Aaron Dwyer


Great stuff

Thanks to Whittaker for the tip on the company that re-enamels.

Mend-a-Bath

They just quoted me $550 for a standard bath and $450 for a vanity basin.

$50 Tub'N'Tile sounds like the way to go.

You can't use your bath for 4 days but that's what friends are for anyway.

Ta
--
Aaron Dwyer
Freestyler (yellow belt)
~ To know and not to do, is really not to know at all.
 
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Reply: 1.1.1
From: J Parker


OK- here's my 2 cents worth on Tub and Tile- DON'T DO IT!!!!

I,too, was going to get a crummy bath resurfaced- looked at the cost, said "Nah, I'll do it myself. No problems- looks real easy!" Followed the instructions to the letter (I'm a bit pedantic like that) and was vastly disappointed. The brush marks were very obvious. It LOOKED like it had been painted (as opposed to resurfacing which looks like a new bath) and it was hard work getting it done and waiting for coats to dry etc.
It didn't help that I was doing it with a leaking tap (had to suspend a plastic bag over the tap and keep emptying it to keep the bath dry) and it was tricky painting in some parts, with a shower screen attached to the bath's side. The added stress of keeping my two year old occupied and out of the bathroom whilst I was doing it (fumes just about knock you out!) probably affects my opinion here!
Still, I was disappointed and even more so when, 10 mths down the track, the paint has started to peel. In the end, I got it professionally replaced with an inner bath (cost me a lot but at least it will last the distance now) and have vowed never to repaint entire bathtubs again. The other thing you have to be careful about is that, if it is a shower over a bath (as mine was) the hot water continously pounding on the same spot will make it wear more quickly. I was told this by both resurfacing companies and the hardware assistants.
Having said all this, however, I have used the WK laminate paint and found it terrific on kitchen cupboards. A renovator friend has just finished painting over old bathroom tiles with their tile paint and it looks unreal- I think it is best in areas which aren't going to experience great wear (walls and splashbacks etc) and it makes for a great effect. They used a roller for the tiles and stuck to white- looks like a new bathroom.

Whatever way you go, have fun- as all renovating should be!
Cheers, Jacque :)
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1
From: Nigel W


Jacque

The kind of practical experience you've shared is what makes this forum so invaluable. on my last reno I contemplated doing a DIY resurface, but decided instead to get the professionals to do it. They were very quick, MUCH cheaper than a replacement job and the end result looks fantastic. and for what its worth there's also a quality guarantee...
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.2
From: Aaron Dwyer


Thanks for that

Since I'm doing it get a valuation done. I don't really mind if the bath falls out once I've got my equity.

I'll replace it at that point.

I also have a 2yr old so your email has inspired me. I'm going to ship mother and son off the to in-laws for 4 days while the bath cures.

Renovation magic for 4 days. :)

Cheers
--
Aaron Dwyer
~ To know and not to do, is really not to know at all.
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.2.1
From: Manny B


Hi Aaron,

I have use the both WK products you have mentioned... the tile/laminate paint was used on wall tiles & splashbacks & the end result was excellent (if you compare it with the ugly brown tiles that were there before). I did it the long way, using a brush rather than a roller, but the results were excellent, the paint is self leveling (being an enamel, rated at 4 times the strength of enamel) & is easy to apply (note: clean you brushes promptly with thinner & DON'T use Turps as wrecked my first brush assuming turps will do the trick)...

Now with the bath tup EPOXY product, you need to sand back your bathtub & vanity thoroughly & use WK's tile cleaner product to ensure it is clean. Turn off the water from the mains if it leaks OR simply replace the tap washer if it leaks as you don't want water to ruin your end results. Well after my first coat of epoxy you could see brushmarks, but used very fine wet/dry sand paper & then applied the second coat, which turned out magic. I have only applied it 2 months now & the tenants have been using it & I happened to go in last week & saw that it is holding up well so far...

Good luck with your project, but the key is to be patient & FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS, as if you miss one, ie. not sand the tub, you may have pealing...

Cheers,

Manny.
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.2.1.1
From: Jeremy Laws


Get it professionally resurfaced. You will have to in less than a year anyway. Better option is to replace the bath. I put it to you that you would spend more on the valuation than the bath itself. You can't do anything meaningful to the tiles except for replacing them.
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.2.1.1.1
From: Michele B


Also tried the cheaper DIY approach, sanding etc as Manny suggested - the result looked OK but it's not a long term solution for a working shower/bath. Minor peeling is evident round the plug hole where there's maximum wear from water impact and foot traffic. Agree with JL - more efficient to do it properly.

Successfully painted tiles though with Spescoat Floortuff, a really durable product developed for use on concrete factory floors. Can be mixed to any colour, satin or gloss.
 
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Bath Repaint Teeth Marks

Reply: 1.1.1.2.1.1.1.1
From: Gee Cee Clay


I had my own home's bath sprayed. It was Ok for a couple of yrs (OK if want a quick sell & a look good property.)

However once the bath was used 3 times a day & toddlers liked to bite on bath edge
(No we don't feed them)the surface soon peeled.

Tenants are usually even harder on your product?
 
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