Can I rent an unrenovated house in Brisbane?

A real estate agent just told me that I cannot rent out the house which I am interested in buying unless I renovate the house. Otherwise, I will be fined by law. Is that true?

He told me that I can live in the house but I cannot rent out unless I have to spend $30,000 to renovate it. Then, he introduced me a better house at the higher price.

I trust the estate agent honest but I just confirm if anyone knows about this government regulations.
 
Sounds like rubbish to me. If it is "livable" you can rent it out at a price that reflects what the market will pay. Does it have a functioning kitchen and bathroom?
 
A real estate agent just told me that I cannot rent out the house which I am interested in buying unless I renovate the house. Otherwise, I will be fined by law. Is that true?

He told me that I can live in the house but I cannot rent out unless I have to spend $30,000 to renovate it. Then, he introduced me a better house at the higher price.

I trust the estate agent honest but I just confirm if anyone knows about this government regulations.

LOL

Please PM the identity of the BS artist involved so I can keep an eye out for him.

Load of crap he is speaking I am afraid. Get him to put it in writing.

Approach seller directly to broker a deal.
 
oplace may be condemned :)

ta
rolf

Of course, if it is condemned, that is a little different :eek:.

Assuming this house is being lived in by someone now, is livable and has no major issues that would stop someone living in it, what would be the problem.

Of course, if it is shabby, run down or has major problems, you will have trouble finding a tenant, but at the right price I imagine anything is rentable.
 
I do not know any law in Brisbane stop rent out an unrenovated house? The agent told me the house is currently occupied by owner. However, it cannot be rented out. Can any Queenslander here has this experience?
 
I've never heard of a house not being able to be rented legally. Unless, of course, it has a demolition order on it because it is such poor condition. However, a phone call to the Brisbane City Council should soon sort that out.

Just make sure there are no safety problems for tenants, as your insurance won't cover you if your tenant is injured because of it.

I would ask the agent for written confirmation of what he is telling you.

We recently inspected houses for our son who is moving to Brisbane. At one house in Chelmer I inquired how much flooding affected the property in 1974 (I knew the answer) and was told by a brash young man that "that was years ago and anyway, Brisbane doesn't flood any more". I though Ozperp may be interested in that gem.

So don't believe everything agents tell you, particularly when they are trying to sell you a different property.

You have inspected the house, haven't you?
Marg
 
It must have a safety switch and a smoke alarm After that its up to the tenant what he wants to rent and live in...
 
Then, he introduced me a better house at the higher price.
He wanted to sell you a more expensive house.
I trust the estate agent honest but I just confirm if anyone knows about this government regulations.

Big mistake! You don't know him from a bar of soap. Listen to everything, trust nothing. He could be honest, but he could also be a crook.
 
The residential tenancies act, inQueensland states:-

The responsibilities of the lessor/agent
The lessor/agent has responsibilities to you, the tenant. They must make sure:
They meet their responsibilities under the agreement:
• they cover the cost of preparing the agreement (and follow the agreement)
• all charges, rates and taxes for the place are paid for
• a full set of keys is given to one tenant, and the others get keys for entry
• they follow the rules for renting set out by the Residential Tenancies and Rooming
Accommodation Act 2008.
They provide you with a suitable home:
• the premises is ready for you to move into on the date agreed
• the premises is fit to live in and in a good state of repair
• the premises meets all laws that deal with health and safety
• the place is reasonably secure
• they do not cause a nuisance, or seriously affect the reasonable peace, comfort and privacy of the tenant
• they keep the premises and any inclusions in good repair during the agreement
• common areas (if there are any) are kept clean.

The other items are smoke alarms, and safety switches. If they are all in order, then you will be OK. We do speak to landlords about "standards" The standard of the property, will attract that standard of tenant. Each year, we look at the "problem" situations, and then work with the landlords, in a plan to improve the property, with the outcome of improvving the tenancy. Win win for every one.

Hope thats been of help.
 
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