Can 'PPOR' be on multiple titles/entities?

Hi,

I made a quick diagram to help ask my questions...


1. If you live in house 1, which is on 3 separate titles, can you claim all 3 titles as your PPoR? For example when applying for land-tax exemption?

2. What if A, B and C all had different names on the titles, (eg You, your partner, and your brother) and you all lived there (in house 1)?

3. What if later on down the track, you decide to also buy property D... what would you need to do to add that to the claim? Would you need to physically demolish house 2 and build your tennis court/pool? :)

-Ian
 
It is *extremely* common to see houses spanning multiple titles around here. Some people have anything up to 14 town blocks together, one house, the rest treated as a paddock. I've never had one myself so I don't know if the council rates are combined together somehow. They are certainly sold as one package on a regular basis and noone bats an eyelid.

Now, if you get rid of blocks A and C at some point you might have some issues ...
 
1. If you live in house 1, which is on 3 separate titles, can you claim all 3 titles as your PPoR? For example when applying for land-tax exemption?
Yes, as RE said.

2. What if A, B and C all had different names on the titles, (eg You, your partner, and your brother) and you all lived there (in house 1)?
NO. Then it would not be "your" PPOR would it? It would be your brother's.

3. What if later on down the track, you decide to also buy property D... what would you need to do to add that to the claim?
This was tested in the courts recently. It was in Point Piper Sydney from memory. Place next door was purchased for the tennis court + the house was used for "entertaining guests". I'm pretty sure the outcome was that both blocks were considered to be PPOR. I'll try to look up the case for you when I get a chance....unless someone else remembers it better than me.
This link refers to it:
http://mullanelindsaynews.com.au/land-tax-where-is-the-principal-place-of-residence/

[/QUOTE]Would you need to physically demolish house 2 and build your tennis court/pool? :)[/QUOTE] Not based on the outcome of the case I mentioned above.
 
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NO. Then it would not be "your" PPOR would it? It would be your brother's.

I was making it a bit simple, but what if it was in 3 separate trusts for example, and they were all essentially YOUR trusts?

Thanks for the link, it looks like you might just have to get rid of the adjoining fence, to claim property D.

The courts found that “an opening sufficient to allow a car to pass through on a long, otherwise divided boundary” was insufficient.
 
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