Car sale

Question for all ... sold my car last year in September.

Received SMS today from buyer complaining about additional costs to service a few things.

What does one say to such person in a nice way ? Or should I not even bother replying ?

Appreciate others input.
 
Refer them to the receipt you gave them, specifically the part where it says "as inspected and accepted".
Are they foreign, by any chance?
I known someone who was recently told by an African buyer that they wanted a refund for the car and what time could they drop it back.
Maybe in some other countries the rules on private sales are different or people just try it on to see if they get a result.
 
Yeah maybe a short sharp reply might be the go, I've had this before.

When you buy anything the responsibility doesn't remain with you, its passed on unfortunately. I'm assuming there was no gun to their head when they bought it.

Its like me calling the previous owner of my house to see if they could pay for the hot water service that packed up....I knew it was due for replacement, my deal not theirs.

Just trying it on i'd say :)
 
just ignore

if you reply he might reply to you, then you reply again and next thing you know someone is doing a driveby on you :D
 
When you reply (which i strongly suggest you don't) make sure you offer to throw in 4 new tyres and a tank of fuel also!!
 
Reminds me of a post on this forum a few months ago where someone who was a mechanic had some customer ring and complain their engine had siezed or something from a service they did a long time ago, assumed said mechanic had forgotten the oil on that service, and wanted them to pay for the engine work. Same general principle anyway. Noone wants it to be their fault.

As you can see I'm very clear on the details :)
 
As the majority of the other posters have said, just don't reply.

They purchased a second hand car from you, what, 5 months ago (I assume you did not offer any warranty :p) and now they want to complain??:eek:

In their attempt to get you to compensate them, they have invested in an SMS text at a total cost of 25 cents. I'd be more impressed if it was a solicitor's letter that cost them $100.00 - but such will not be forthcoming.

Maybe they had a a few drinks one night and decided to vent their frustrations at you? ;). That's the problem with instant messaging, e-mails and the like. (If you don't believe me have a read of some of the posts done on here on a Fri or Sat night :rolleyes:)
 
Reminds me of a post on this forum a few months ago where someone who was a mechanic had some customer ring and complain their engine had siezed or something from a service they did a long time ago, assumed said mechanic had forgotten the oil on that service, and wanted them to pay for the engine work. Same general principle anyway. Noone wants it to be their fault.

As you can see I'm very clear on the details :)

That was me :)

Not sure if said customer now realises that maybe she should have checked her oil in the 6 months after the service....
 
If the problems weren't there before hand then a short message along the lines of:

Sorry to hear you have had to spend a few extra dollars. Those problems didn't exist beforehand and at least you saved a few dollars when you got it for such a bargain price. Being a 2nd hand car problems can arise at anytime.
 
Refer them to the receipt you gave them, specifically the part where it says "as inspected and accepted".

For this to stand up, you need to have their signature on your copy, without that you can't prove you ever wrote it or that they accepted it.

It needs to be written as "sold as is, with no warranty expressed or implied" and have the purchasers signature on it.

The purchaser can no longer deny it.
 
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