Cockroach complaint....?

Apparently there are cockroaches in my townhouse. The tenant has "seen some"...they "fell down from the skylight while tenant was in the toilet"...and..."they seem to be in packs"...

Tenant has been in residence nearly 2 months, previously the property was vacant for at least 3 months before settlement, and before that it was a rental.

Place is in immaculate condition, no sign of any pests on any visit I had to the place, during my building/pest inspection, or when I was in for a week doing minor work when I purchased it. I spoke to tenant at length about 3 weeks after moving in and asked if there were any issues etc - nothing at all.

Not sure what the PM is expecting here? If they are dropping down from the skylight are they coming in from outside, and would a pest treatment really stop them dropping on the tenant while in the toilet?
 
lol. I had a tenant in Melbourne who emailed me about an infestation of spiders invading the house in swarms but I coud not order normal pest control because her dogs are sensitive to chemicals and I had to order environmentally friendly pest control :rolleyes:

I told her to get some mortein surface spray and I would reimburse her for the cost :rolleyes:

Of course she didn't. The whole thing was part of an elaborate scam where she produced a series of complaint emails when trying to get her bond back after wrecking the house. I just produce my responses back to her as my evidence. In the end the judge split the bond 50/50. Better than nothing.

We never did find those spiders.
 
Why not get a pest treatment. We do this at the start of any tenancy, and ask the outgoing tenant to do a treatment when they leave. We know they have gone in with the treatment, and it is up to them to keep it pest free while they are there. If the place was empty three months before settlement, you probably just need to get it done.
 
Apparently there are cockroaches in my townhouse. The tenant has "seen some"...they "fell down from the skylight while tenant was in the toilet"...and..."they seem to be in packs"...
Give the cops a call, under the VLAD laws it's illegal for more than two cockroaches to gather in public together.

A couple/few pest 'bombs' will get rid of roaches (and pesty tenants if need be). After that use roach baits. I've found that combination to be highly effective.
 
Hi Pipsal, in NSW I inform owners they have a responsibility to ensure it is pest free when a tenant moves in. After a period of time I inform the tenant that the owner is not responsibly for "Mother Nature" and it would be the tenants responsibility to spray and treat. Owner has not attracted the pests. Therefore is 2 mths just the start of the lease no therefore tenants responsibility.
 
The big question is what type of cockroach is it? In VIC, some years we have an influx of cockroaches at lots of our properties (other years it's ants or mice or spiders! Depends on a lot of things really as to which critter decides to get active). I spoke to our pest control guy and he was getting lots of calls from agents and the general public about the common shining cockroach. These aren't considered a pest and don't nest in your house but they do wander inside looking for water and food sometimes.

http://www.ozanimals.com/wildlife/Insect/Cockroaches.html

Lots of information there as to what types of cockroaches can and can't be treated and you can figure out what type of cockroach you're dealing with.
 
I agree with this..
Why not get a pest treatment. We do this at the start of any tenancy, and ask the outgoing tenant to do a treatment when they leave. We know they have gone in with the treatment, and it is up to them to keep it pest free while they are there. If the place was empty three months before settlement, you probably just need to get it done.
Not too long ago I was told by my PM that the landlord is obliged to pay for a yearly pest control visit.. That's not the case - it must be in the lease.
http://www.rta.qld.gov.au/Resources...il-May-2014/Pest-control-in-rental-properties
Generally, lessors must ensure the property is fit for the tenant to live in and kept in good repair. Lessors can take preventative pest control measures such as white ant/termite treatments to minimise the risk of damage to a dwelling?s structure.

The tenant must keep the place clean and undamaged, and return it in the same condition as at the start of the tenancy, after allowing for fair wear and tear.

During a tenancy, responsive pest control measures may be needed, such as treatments for pests and vermin such as ants, fleas, cockroaches and rats.

The lessor/agent and the tenant should consider why the pests are present and whether it relates to one party?s failure to comply with their tenancy obligations.

If vermin such as mice or rats are caused by the tenant?s actions, the tenant would be responsible for dealing with the pests.

Lessors/agents can specify that pest control must be carried out to a required standard at the end of the tenancy if that was the standard at the start of the tenancy.
 
In WA


Tenants Advisory says

When is the tenant responsible for pest control?

The tenant is generally responsible for the eradication of vermin if the infestation occurs after the tenant has moved in and if the infestation can be shown to be caused by the tenant?s activities or lack of cleanliness.

Section 38 of The Residential Tenancies Act (1987) WA deals with the tenant?s responsibility for cleanliness and damage.

If you have been living in the property for several months and an infestation of cockroaches occurs, it is generally the tenant who must pay for the fumigation (unless you organise alternative arrangements with the owner).

The tenant may not be held responsible for vermin eradication when you can show that the owner is in breach of the tenancy agreement (for example, by not offering the property in a clean and safe condition) and that this breach has caused the infestation.

Alternatively, if you can show that the infestation was caused by ? for example ? a next door neighbour keeping uncovered rubbish in the backyard, then you may refer the matter to the Local Council for action.
The issue of who is responsible for pest control can sometimes be a grey area.

DOCEP guide says

Pest and vermin control

The landlord is responsible for the treatment of infestations such as fleas, white ants, cockroaches, mice and rats, as well as the annual maintenance inspection. Landlords are not responsible for infestations caused by your
activities or lack of cleanliness.

For example, you are obligated to take regular basic pest prevention measures, such as storing food properly and using general household sprays
and baits where necessary.
 
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