Development of next door - Reject or Accept?

My next door neighbor owns 2 block of land. The total size is 1441 square meters (34 meters by 42.4 meters) They will demolish their home and build 8 double story 2-bed rooms units. I just got the detailed plan from Council.
The street is a very quiet NO-Trough road and has 16 blocks. Only one block was subdivided to two residence a few years back.

My land is 711 square meters (16.9*42.4). I am planning to demolish my house and build 3 units on my land 2 years later. The house is rented out at the moment. I'd like to know the impact to my rental property and my potential development.

If I don't develop my place , will the 8 units next door degrade the capital value of my house and rental income ?

What kinds of reason would be considered reasonable by Council if I ask them to change their plan? e.g. build 6 rather than 8. What factor should I consider ? e.g. car parking shortage on the street?

Any negative or positive impact to my potential development if I reject it ?

I know they want to go ahead at all costs. The chance to stop the development is little. I just want to minimize the impact to the capital value of my house and potential development.

Any suggestion would be highly appreciated. Thanks.



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I suggest you talk to the council and fill them in on your plans to see how they'll be effected by the neighbours subdivision. If there are problems approach the owners and try to work out a win win outcome.

Are the current owners keeping some or all the properties? because if they are just remember that if you make things hard for them they could make things hard for you when you decide to subdivide.
 
I just want to minimize the impact to the capital value of my house and potential development.

What proof do you have that the value of your home will be affected?

You say you want all sorts of reasons to list in your objection so it does not go ahead/minimise the development as it's next door, yet, you intend to build yourself soon and don't see a problem with that.

If you intend to build, let it be. So when it comes your turn it will be a smoother run.
 
So it's ok for you to build units but not him lol.

Try your luck and see how much influence you have on telling what others what they can and can't build.
As posted you would need to have proof and evidence of your reasons which will include reports & research which can be done for a small fee, and a time limit for you to object.
And since they did it first, they will then surely argue that a such in a small street 8 units are already stretching the infrastructure to the limit and any extra will be detrimental to all others and you should include infrastructure upgrades in your plan and costs.
 
What kinds of reason would be considered reasonable by Council if I ask them to change their plan? e.g. build 6 rather than 8. What factor should I consider ? e.g. car parking shortage on the street?

Check the council development plans for your zoning and see what minimum lot size is allowed and see if the 8 within the rules and that it meets requirements for open space etc. This should all be on the council website.

Gools
 
We moved home after 25 years because of a new Tuscan development built on three blocks next door. Hated Hated hated it and the noise from the airconditioners 24/7 just outside our bedroom sliding door (as we didnt require airconditioning, just a night breeze) was dreadful.

Damn Tuscan monstrosities are not built for Adelaide heat.
 
Talk to the guy next door.

Maybe you can combine developments and squeeze an extra unit in. His 8 + your 3 + 1 extra maybe?

If possible its best to co-operate in an oligopoly rather than be cut-throat competitors and screw each other. See Nash-Cournot for mathematical basis.
 
It sounds like your main argument would be the bulk of the new units. Also, getting 6 untis on there may be some over shadows and over looking private open spaces issues.

If your really against it you can object by writting a letter to the council or even hire a town planner to write it on your behalf (which you will have to pay for)

If your planning to put units up in the future it will make your planning application go through a lot easier with those unit so mabe it isn't a bad thing.
 
What a Planner Wants

Just thought the perspective of a town planner may be useful to answer your question. When advertising an application the planner is seeking information on how a neighbour may be affected personally. The types of things that are considered are your amenity (eg losing sunlight or privacy), issues of car parking in the area, perhaps how it impacts visually on you, the street etc. It is up to the planner to decide how that issue will be addressed if it is deemed necessary. Requesting that the number of units be reduced will probably not go very far.

The suggestion to pool your resources with the person next door was a good idea (though it doesn't seem to meet with your timeframe) as councils love orderly planning!
 
Just make sure he has MORE than enough parking - at least a car space each and several more again for visitors, or you might find *your* development gets vetoed if his doesn't have the parking and your street gets full of cars.
 
I think the your neighbour's DA could be a 'possible positive' for your future plans eg. bulk and scale of your development is less than this development if approved.

Shadowing of your block would be the only concern IMHO and the reverse is true when you put in your DA that your new building does shadow the units outdoor space.

Read you DA guidelines. Most DA guidelines suggest owner consult with neighbours' prior to lodging their DA.


Cheers
Sheryn
 
I think the your neighbour's DA could be a 'possible positive' for your future plans eg. bulk and scale of your development is less than this development if approved.

Shadowing of your block would be the only concern IMHO and the reverse is true when you put in your DA that your new building does shadow the units outdoor space.

Read you DA guidelines. Most DA guidelines suggest owner consult with neighbours' prior to lodging their DA.


Cheers
Sheryn



Yep. Precedent next door for something larger than what you're contemplating on your site will add value to your property, whether or not you develop yourself or merely get an effective DA and flog off.

All the other recommendations alluded to above by others have merit especially if you wish to live there. It is also important for your tenants or future purchasers of your developed product assuming you sell off.

For me, the value of your dirt has risen...........ride the next door wave :)
 
I would first check if their application to council is Code or Impact assessable.

I do not like your chances if it is Code. If however it is Impact assessable you have a chance to alter their plans by way of written objection. Change of Plan is on the money with you highlighting amenity, car parking, visual impact I would also add Line of sight into your yard and increase Lighting (include outside and vehicle lights) impacting on you.

However seeing as you are looking at adding units yourself I am surprised you are looking at it as a negative I would be thinking it will add value to your block in the long run.
 
However seeing as you are looking at adding units yourself I am surprised you are looking at it as a negative I would be thinking it will add value to your block in the long run.

Exactly....He'll probably be knocking on your door next to see if u want to sell, and the neighbour next to u and so on....Everyones property will increase on value...time to buy more if u can.

JB
 
If your plan is to do similar, its all good news, the values will be proven for you bank , the council rules will be more flexable, the end vals on your project will esculate, on prior sales in the area,
Truly concerns me that you cant see how lucky you are for this project to happen next door to you, especialy knowing what your intentions are??:confused:
 
Get involved in design

I'd talk to your neighbour... say you're interested in going the same route and don't want to object just for the sake of it, but that you want to be involved in the design stage to make sure the development isn't too ugly as that might affect values.

If you get on well with the neighbour and s/he allows you to follow the project ie mentors you, then you might learn a heap about the process and save megabucks.

Also, your neighbour might be interested in buying your place for an even bigger development... perhaps you could develop now on a profit share basis if you can't afford to go it alone now.
 
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