Floorboards or parquetry for a duplex?

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From: Dave :)


Hi everyone,

I need some feedback from anyone who has built a duplex and/or used timber flooring. I'm having timber throughout the entire duplex, but aren't too sure what to use - parquetry or floorboards. I used parquetry in a previous home and it added value to my property greatly. Plus it was great for wet areas also. The builder of these duplexes has suggested floor boards (on battens) instead...saying it's an even better option for wet areas, provided they are sealed and polished professionally. I'm just wondering how this will affect the noise level between the two duplexes. Which of the two options are perceived to be more desirable/add value better? And, what type of timber?...Tassie Oak?

Cheers,

Dave
 
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Reply: 1
From: Peter Davidson


Hi David,

Parquetry is "classier" and more attractive than floorboards if you ask me. I think it also would add more value to your home than floorboards. Floorboards are nice too, but just don't have that charming effect. I'm not sure which one is more expensive though? Anybody know? That could sway your decision.

Regards,
Peter.
 
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Reply: 1.1
From: Dave :)


Hi Peter,

I purchased these two off the plan IP's on the condition they include timber floors - either parquetry or floor boards, my choice. Just unsure which to choose - the cost is the builders problem. Thanks for your comments.

Cheers,

Dave
 
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Reply: 1.1.1
From: Martin Dorney


Hi David,
I'm a professional timber flooring contractor, both installations, sanding and finishing.
I'd like to think i am a professional property investor as well!
In relation to parquerty, mosiac 8-9mm (cheaper) or block 14-19mm (more expensive)
and floorboards, cost and aesthetic appeal is usually a major factor in determining which type of timber floor to install.

Be wary with your builder and in choosing a timber floor because various factors influence price e.g. standard or select grade, timber species, type of laying (on joists, battens or direct stick) and design (patterns or borders).
The builder will usually recommend the cheapest option if his paying!
e.g.tassie-oak or pine, stay clear if you have a choice.

Timber flooring is not recommend for wet areas even if sealed, according to 'Australian standards'.
Wet areas should be tiled for better performance in the long term e.g. water overflows etc.

I understand you have a choice in selection, choose a timber that is durable, very hard, dense and of a commercial grade e.g. jarrah, blackbutt, brushbox, bluegum, turpentine, ironbark to name a few; all these timbers have a janka hardness of 8.5 or above. This will minimize scratches, markings and indentations.
Note: Tassie oak approx.$35m2 compared with Qld. silver ash $150-180m2
Recommend investigate further!

Timber floors will certainly add appeal to a wide range of people and value to your properties.
However, as a rule of thumb, they are generally noisier and colder than carpets.

Hope to be of help!

Cheers,
Martin
 
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Reply: 1.1.2
From: Michelle Riley


Hi Dave,I love parquetry,especially the strip style.Last time I had a quote it was much more expensive than timber boards.
Wet areas?Do you mean bathrooms?I've heard
of problems with it lifting.
Think you have to be skilled to lay parquetry properly.
I prefer light colored timbers,victorian ash
is a nice one.Boarders using a darker timber
can be a feature.
Cheers Michelle
 
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Reply: 1.1.2.1
From: Dave :)


Hi Michelle and Martin,

Thanks heaps for your comments. Wow, I'm glad I read your posts before I submitted my signature to the specification schedule.(signing and delivering it tomorrow) I think I'm now locked into floor boards - but will insist on something better than Victorian Ash...maybe Brushbox. I actually had timber floors in my own place, and in worked very well in wet areas...it was sealed and glossed very well, though. Unless there's a very good reason given not to have it in the kitchen and bathroom, I think I'll go ahead with it.

Thanks again guys..I appreciate it.

Cheers,

Dave
 
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