Flooring in Basic Reno.

From: See Change


Have just bought a cheap house in brisbane which needs a basic reno.

We've worked out most of the things that we're doing, but are uncertain as to the best flooring to use. Currently there is carpet which needs replacing , and at this stage we are uncertain to the state of the floor boards underneath. It's not on a slab.
Bathroom / toilet tiles are in good condition.

Alternatives I've noticed in similar houses are

1 If floor boards are ok , get it sanded / "varnished". If not get "floating timber floor".

2 Tiled ( property manager keen on that ) but I have a genetic dislike of fully floored houses ( but I'm not living there )

3 Carpeted every where except kitchen / bathrooms. ? timber or vinyl in kitchen.

4 Carpet in lounge / bedrooms with vinyl in high wear areas and dinning room.

Would appreciate peoples thoughts on what they've found has been the best alternatives , not necessarily just in terms of price , but also in terms of low maintainence , maintaining looks and renter preference.

see change


it's better to be guided by your dreams than your fears
 
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Reply: 1
From: Michael Keleher


See Change
Not sure of the Brisbane market but I have done plenty of this sort of reno in inner Melbourne.
Firstly I would pull the carpet off the smoothedge and fold it with the underlay into the middle so I could insect the timber flooring completely. Then place it back against the skirt loosely.
If the timber is in good shape and no reblocking is required I would sand and polish the total floor area including the wet areas.
If you are painting as well I would leave the carpet down as a drop sheet before removal.
Fully polished floors with plenty of stainless steel is "the look" that maybe is running out of legs but I cannot see carpet coming back too soon.
I just replaced half a house of carpet I laid only 5 months ago after getting the renter out.
Floating floors are easy to lay but give a very drummy sound and I think look a bit cheap around the skirts.
Just my way of doing things but it is quick,cost effective, looks good and the punters like it.
Cheers Mike
 
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"Flooring, walls & ceilings in Basic Reno."

Reply: 1.1
From: Kristine .


Michael (and others)

Do you have any experience using Haymes Rendertex?

In England, most houses have Artex somewhere, usually in decorative ceilings. This type of interior finish is not common here, but I've just bought a post-war bungalow with high ceilings, and thought a texture above the picture rails may add a bit of interest without being too flash.

Ceiling roses or plates would be too elaborate.

Also, this has faux brick cement sheet siding (erk) which I will remove if I can, or else render, probably with Rendertex as it goes on with a roller.

Naturally, I hope that the original weatherboards are under the faux brick. Have you had any experience with removing cement (asbestos or otherwise) siding?

All comments welcome

Kristine
 
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"Flooring, walls & ceilings in Basic Reno."

Reply: 1.1.1
From: Michael Keleher


Kristine
I have not used the Haymes Rendertex product but have used similar ones from other suppliers........but never on faux brick.
I think that would be a waste of time and money. The weatherboards should still be there, so take the siding off and repair any damaged or rotten boards and reblock if required or get a tradesman to do it.
I am assuming your house is in a mostly wb area where the trend is to renovate in sympathy with the period.
From memory Artex is a trademarked brand of textured coating for internal walls and ceilings.......many similar products are available here and well worth the effort especially where the plaster is ripplely, uneven or hairlined cracked......above the picture rails would be great for a touch of flair. These products are easy to use, very forgiving and look good........ask the paint shop guys for tips, they are usually very helpful.
Cheers Mike
 
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"Flooring, walls & ceilings in Basic Reno."

Reply: 1.1.1.1
From: Kristine .


Hi Mike

Thanks for your comments ... faux brick.... would be a waste of time and money. The weatherboards should still be there, so take the siding off and repair any damaged or rotten boards and reblock if required ... in a mostly wb area where the trend is to renovate in sympathy with the period ... (rendering)above the picture rails would be great for a touch of flair...
my sentiments exactly.

I also think having the Haymes or Dulux consultant to come and advise will be a good investment.

However, it is a little poetic license to think that 'post-war' was an architectural period of any note, but an interesting period in our history regardless.

The house was 'builder built', not 'owner built' as so many were at that time of labour and materials shortages, and although small, is blessed with a good and efficient floor plan. The 'modernisations' can be readily (note I did not say easily) dealt with ie removing the various upgrades such as a mixture of wood and aluminium window frames.

Next question: Have you had any experience with gas log fire inserts? My budget will allow either a touch-of-a-button gas log fire which will heat up to 8 squares, or gas ducted heating, but not both. If I go with the glf, then I will lay electric underfloor heating pads in the wet areas, and install electric thermopanel wall heaters in the bedrooms.

Alternatively, a company in Perth (I'm in Melbourne) sells electric log fire inserts to sit in the fire grate, and these flicker but do not emit any heat. As I would like to install a clothes drying cupboard with a heating duct, the elf may be a decorative addition to a more practical situation.

I intend to do a really classy job, as my market competition is the new upmarket units in the area, and my little house must exude charm, class and all mod cons with a noteable 'point of difference' as it will be marketed at the new construction price point.

Any and all renovation tips would be most welcome

Cheers

Kristine
 
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Reply: 2
From: Greg Mowat


See Change

We just renovated a place on the Sunshine Coast Qld and had the same delema - old yellow/green carpet.

We stripped it out and laid the floating floorboards - looks great.
the trick with the edging (because you need to leave a gap for movement) is to remove all your skirting boards first.
This has two advantages. The first being that when you lay the flooring you don't have to be as precise because the edges are going to be covered.
Secondly, painting the house becomes a breeze because you don't need drop sheets as the floor is going to be covered anyway. Also when painting the walls you don't need to be accurate at the base of the wall as it too will be covered. We painted to walls cream and prepainted all skirtings Gloss White which gave a great looking border. All you had to do once the skirtings were attached is touchup the screw holes. For walls that were dead straight we just used liquid nails to hold on the skirtings so that there were no holes to repair.
Quick and easy solution that cost $2800 for a large lounge, hall, 3 bedrooms (including wardrobe). Were quoted $800 for someone to install it for us but we did it ourselves - 2days labour.

Cheers
Greg
 
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