Grout dries unevenly

We recently employed a builder to renovate our ensuite. After a shower, the grout dries unevenly which looks strange. I have attached a picture which shows the shower recess 48 hours since taking a shower.
Has anyone seen this before? Is it normal?
The builder said that the grout doesn't look uneven when completely dry (which is probably true) but the shower is used daily, so is never completely dry!!
We think it looks terrible. Should we ask that it be regrouted before payment or just pay him and put up with it?
Thanks for your experience and advice,
Crystal
 

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Looks like the grout may not be level overall and staying wet in the hollows.
Did the tradesman apply a finishing sealer which should repel the water from
grout/tiles and stop the water making the grout look wet.
 
Thanks for your reply. That's the strange thing, it doesn't seem lower in the darker areas and the darker areas are faintly visible even when completely dry. The water falls correctly towards the drain. I don't know about sealer.
Thanks, Crystal
 
I remember being advised years ago by a bathroom renovator that light coloured grout would be fine for the walls but I should always use a darker grout on the floors for the reason that your photo demonstrates.
 
I remember being advised years ago by a bathroom renovator that light coloured grout would be fine for the walls but I should always use a darker grout on the floors for the reason that your photo demonstrates.

Kinda true, but not quite. What the OP is experiencing in that showertray is enhanced efflorescence due to the constant wet/dry/wet/dry effect.

Grout is a cementious product, and as the moisture dries on initial cure of the grout, an uneven amount of crystalized salts filters to the surface, causing the discolouration. This is enhanced greatly due to the above effects of wet and dry nature of a showertray.

There is nothing structurally unsound, and nothing anyone can do as it is a natually occuring phenomenon. It is only an aesthetic problem, and I would not be concerned, and definitely not a reason for non payment.

pinkboy......wow theres a few big words in there for a dirty old tiler/painter!:cool:
 
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Thank you for the explanation pinkboy! How would a tiler prevent this from occurring and/or how can I prevent this at the next renovation?
Regards,
Crystal
 
Kinda true, but not quite. What the OP is experiencing in that showertray is enhanced efflorescence due to the constant wet/dry/wet/dry effect.

Grout is a cementious product, and as the moisture dries on initial cure of the grout, an uneven amount of crystalized salts filters to the surface, causing the discolouration. This is enhanced greatly due to the above effects of wet and dry nature of a showertray.

There is nothing structurally unsound, and nothing anyone can do as it is a natually occuring phenomenon. It is only an aesthetic problem, and I would not be concerned, and definitely not a reason for non payment.

pinkboy......wow theres a few big words in there for a dirty old tiler/painter!:cool:

Highlighted. Can also depend on how squeezed out the tiler has his grouting sponge and leaving too much moisture in the grout, but remembering also, grout has a 7 day 'full' cure time. So the added water from your first shower or a test run may have left further moisture to soak in varying the cure time.

pinkboy
 
Grout is a cementious product, and as the moisture dries on initial cure of the grout, an uneven amount of crystallized salts filters to the surface,This is the Efflorescence witch can be removed with an appropriate Efflorescence remover, then waterproof the grout with a below surface sealer. The shower base grout lines will then appear uniform. causing the discolouration. This is enhanced greatly due to the above effects of wet and dry nature of a showertray.

Gerd
 
We have had this occur and what I put it down to was that the grout has different densities based on how much grout has been forced in.

A lot of time the grout doesn't enter the space evenly and you can get air bubbles which then stop the entry of further grout.

The efflorescence issue can be fixed by laying tiles directly on the water proofing rather than having a sand and cement bed between the waterproofing layer and the tiles. We now apply the waterproofing layer on top of the sand/cement layer. We are slow and allow plenty of time for the sand cement to cure.

After tiling we also use a sealer on the tiles even if the tile is impervious. This seals the grout and tile and you no longer get the water penetration. This also needs you to silicone the corners to avoid hairline cracks at the corners which would allow water to enter the subsurface.

Cheers
 
Thank you so much for your replies! Now we know what is going on, we can have an informed discussion with the builder.
Kudos to you guys for your advice! :)
Cheers,
Crystal
 
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