Had any experience on some of these common items?

Im doing some initial costings for a subdivision just north of Brisbane, and am finding general costing details really hard to find online.

Anyone had any experience on some of these items that can help me out with a rough estimate on one, some or all?

Tree clearing per acre? (need 3 acres)
Slashing per acre? (need 3 acres)

Asphalt Road per metre? (244m x 6m)
Concrete curbing (520m linear)
Concrete footpath (standard size is 1.2m x 100mm?)need 152m long
Nature Strip type Turf per metre (2,000m2)

Contour plans (700m2 block)
Soil Tests for (700m2 block)
Compaction Certificates (700m2 block)
 
Contours only for a standard size block to AHD should be around the $500-$700 + GST mark from your local surveyor. The surveyors board recommends around $1200 + GST for a full Feature and Level Survey to AHD (if you're needing existing buildings, trees, services, driveways, setbacks etc.)

Obviously price varies with difficulty - cheaper if clear block, more pricey if it's a forest. Also variations in price if you're going to AHD (Australian Height Datum) or just an arbitrary datum. Most councils in Vic require AHD, so probably the same for up your way.

Soil testing isn't very expensive, would only expect a couple of hundred for that.

Cheers,
 
Contours only for a standard size block to AHD should be around the $500-$700 + GST mark from your local surveyor. The surveyors board recommends around $1200 + GST for a full Feature and Level Survey to AHD (if you're needing existing buildings, trees, services, driveways, setbacks etc.)

Obviously price varies with difficulty - cheaper if clear block, more pricey if it's a forest. Also variations in price if you're going to AHD (Australian Height Datum) or just an arbitrary datum. Most councils in Vic require AHD, so probably the same for up your way.

Soil testing isn't very expensive, would only expect a couple of hundred for that.

Cheers,


Thanks! You mentioned surveying in a forest is a bit more expensive, is it more work or danger money? surveyors are snake-resistant arent they?

haha
:D
 
Thanks! You mentioned surveying in a forest is a bit more expensive, is it more work or danger money? surveyors are snake-resistant arent they?

haha
:D

Haha ironically many surveyors are the inside-type people. Trees take much time to measure, they get in the way (more setups), clearing obscuring branches takes time etc. Would take a flat, empty block any day of the week! :p
 
Haha ironically many surveyors are the inside-type people. Trees take much time to measure, they get in the way (more setups), clearing obscuring branches takes time etc. Would take a flat, empty block any day of the week! :p

Have a look at the block, well its pretty flat, but theres one or two trees there... how do you even survey a block like this one? Do those little lasery things go through trees these days?
 

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Have a look at the block, well its pretty flat, but theres one or two trees there... how do you even survey a block like this one? Do those little lasery things go through trees these days?

My old man is a surveyor and in a situation like that block, it is actually possible to use a different type of theodolite to the traditional laser sight. From memory he has done quick a bit of work out in the sticks where he simply used a satellite version that doesn't require direct line of sight!
 
Have a look at the block, well its pretty flat, but theres one or two trees there... how do you even survey a block like this one? Do those little lasery things go through trees these days?

Theodolites use an infra-red beam which to some extent goes through shrubs when reflected back from the prism. Obviously won't go through anything solid though. Would be a difficult survey, but each tree would have to be located one by one, and to make sure we don't double up or miss any I'd be painting crosses on each one!

It would be a process starting at the front of the block, traversing through to the back (probably zig-zagging) towards the rear. Levels are located at 10m intervals typically in a grid pattern. Would expect at least 2 possibly 3 days there though. If it was cleared before the survey, well that would be a different story.
 
My old man is a surveyor and in a situation like that block, it is actually possible to use a different type of theodolite to the traditional laser sight. From memory he has done quick a bit of work out in the sticks where he simply used a satellite version that doesn't require direct line of sight!

I think I know what you're talking about, is it the LIDAR system? A small plane flies overhead which has a laser attachment underneath. This fires thousands of points to the ground creating a 3D model. Haven't done any of this myself, only remembering from the remote sensing class at uni a few years back!

It's also possible to use new theodolites that essentially are on auto-pilot. Mind you they're ~50k! Just set them up and they rotate around locating thousands of points to also create a 3D model. Seems like a bit of hassle doing the filtering of unwanted points when going the traditional methods is much simpler.
 
Theodolites use an infra-red beam which to some extent goes through shrubs when reflected back from the prism. Obviously won't go through anything solid though. Would be a difficult survey, but each tree would have to be located one by one, and to make sure we don't double up or miss any I'd be painting crosses on each one!

It would be a process starting at the front of the block, traversing through to the back (probably zig-zagging) towards the rear. Levels are located at 10m intervals typically in a grid pattern. Would expect at least 2 possibly 3 days there though. If it was cleared before the survey, well that would be a different story.

Yeah I was quite interested to know how it would even be possible to survey a block of this nature. It contains remnant vegetation which the state won't let me just destroy without a DA so at best I could clear the scrub so someone could at least walk through the trees. As it is now, I would hope surveyors use a buddy system cause I'm sure it would be quite easy to lose a couple of ya in there......:D

I mean if I can't afford a flyover 3d laser map that is......
 
I think I know what you're talking about, is it the LIDAR system? A small plane flies overhead which has a laser attachment underneath. This fires thousands of points to the ground creating a 3D model. Haven't done any of this myself, only remembering from the remote sensing class at uni a few years back!

It's also possible to use new theodolites that essentially are on auto-pilot. Mind you they're ~50k! Just set them up and they rotate around locating thousands of points to also create a 3D model. Seems like a bit of hassle doing the filtering of unwanted points when going the traditional methods is much simpler.


This LIDAR system you are talking about is that the terrain feature on nearmaps.com? is that what this 3d modeling stuff looks like as an end product?
 
This LIDAR system you are talking about is that the terrain feature on nearmaps.com? is that what this 3d modeling stuff looks like as an end product?

Nope it's much more detailed than nearmap. I'll try to dig out an example and post it up. It's typically used for larger mapping of inaccessible areas but I don't see why it couldn't be applied on a smaller scale for residential sites.
 
Nope it's much more detailed than nearmap. I'll try to dig out an example and post it up. It's typically used for larger mapping of inaccessible areas but I don't see why it couldn't be applied on a smaller scale for residential sites.

Does this mean I cant submit this nearmap terrain survey to council as a proper survey? haha:D

Nearmaps isnt going to knock out the surveying profession just yet then?
 

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Not quite yet with that kind of resolution! :)

Here's a pic of what I'm talking about just grabbed off the internet. It has its applications definitely, especially with larger, rural projects. Obviously shadowing is an issue which can only be solved through an actual survey.

 
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