how do you help?

i'm watching this thing on ABC about incarcerating juveniles and the mixed results the "jail-em" system gives, and the great result rehab is giving them - and how much less rehab actually costs.

it just makes me wonder - i see some kids with the guts and determination and smarts to get off their bum and do something, but with the lack of infrastructure to help them, they fall by the wayside again.

i'd love to set up a network of psychologists, youth workers and mentors to help these troubled kids. really - i would. just give it to 'em hard and fast and blow thier mind as to what they can accomplish - and periodically support them when they're there.

i've often thought about this, and it's seriously something i'd like to set up.

maybe i could use a business structure to buy a whole heap of CF+ properties and then use those excess funds to start something....

how would i go about starting this? anyone? :confused:
 
set up a charity and collect donations. approach large land developers for a block of land and build a charity house to be kept as a refuge - a sort of half way house
 
but surely as an interim measure? like if you go from homeless you need that step of having an address, place to shower get your mail etc until you get an income

DK tho as I have never been homeless
 
Now I didn't see this show but I've found success in rehab depends a lot on the person being ready for it. This is the reason why rehab can work and the reason why there is often a criteria and conditions to some programs.

Community and training programs as well as shelters and drop in centers help change attitudes but the reality is there are many you won't reach or be interested.

Many of these juveniles have developed well ingrained negative behaviours and have serious drug habits that they can not see the benefits and sabotage any attempts for help.

One program here in SA which has shown some success is the court diversion program. It's aim is to encourage them into a rehab program as a second chance rather than have them enter jail and becoming part of the revolving door.

I'm not trying to discourage you. There can never be enough help for these types of juveniles and society should never give up on them. Helping them benefits them and the community.
 
oh yeah absolutely - there will always be a serious portion of kids who don't want help.

probably part of that teenager mentality - angry at the world, know everything, happy to self destruct just coz you don't want them to.

but there are some seriously smart kids out there. there are those that are too smart for school, where school is so slow for them that they tire of it, get bored and become a problem. what if you could put a challenge to these kids?

my BIL was one of them - too smart for school. high school drop out. i recognised it immediately when others didnt. i put him on a track that challenged him after a huge confrontation with him - and he responded. he's doing what he wants earning big bucks as a rigger and welder. he feels fulfilled by his life - a far cry from being lost in dope and a budding pyromaniac with the most he could look forward to was nailing the latest Deicide guitar riff.

one example doesn't make me an overnight hero - you need pro's to do this stuff - but it's a perfect example of what can be achieved.

John, i'd like to get them an income so they can afford their own place, rather than put them up and then kick them out when the cash rolls in. that alone could send someone backwards very quickly.
 
This was always my dream if ever I won big on Lotto. Grab 100 street kids or kids open to rehab, get them on the 'commune' which they have helped to build themselves (learning valuable skills along the way). Dormitory set up, buddy system to teach responsibility for others, set up a couple of businesses for them to get involved with that they can cope with e.g. kennels, fruit and vegies, eggs, etc. plus learn business skills. Have psychologists on board to help them sort out their 'baggage', teachers to get reading, writing & arithmetic education as well as good role models and so on.

2 years then out into the real world with the door always open for help or advice.

Sadly, I haven't won Lotto yet. :( Would love to see you get this off the ground. Good luck.
Olly
 
Hi Aaron, this link may give you some further idea's. Bassendean council's Kids at risk programs. http://www.bys.net.au/programmes.html
YOur local council may have buildings that you could rent for free and set up something like this, or you could approach local council to start up a commitee if they don't already have one.
 
I think you'll find there's a few NGOs in perth who already provide such a service.

"Youth Focus" is one of them. If you are serious, set up a meeting with their director (it was her brain child) and get some advice.
 
Hey good for you, Aaron.

I think most juvenile crime is a result of bad parenting and no or bad moral guidence.

In this documentary, does it talk about rehab for all Juveniles? Does a team of Psych's etc sort out those that COULD be rehabilitated from those that couldn't?

It would be a huge task. Immensely satisfying though if you actually got to see results..

Regards JO
 
i'd be using OPM to fund it, so if it went bust then so be it - but i'd like to give it a shot.

i don't think it'd be a blanket invite or open door. i want to select those that show promise and desire to change, not just provide somewhere for a lost cause to crash and cause problems.

harsh i know, but it's a harsh subject with equally harsh kids.

thanks for all the advice everyone. i'll look into it further.
 
Having worked a bit with teens, I suggest structuring a program that keeps them very busy, and wears them out physically. Kids who are kept busy with constructive tasks, and treated with respect learn to respect themselves, often fairly quickly. You can then get them to start mentoring each other.
 
Having worked a bit with teens, I suggest structuring a program that keeps them very busy, and wears them out physically. Kids who are kept busy with constructive tasks, and treated with respect learn to respect themselves, often fairly quickly. You can then get them to start mentoring each other.

Agree. A contract at the beginning is good too. They need very clear guidelines and the ones that respect and accept those generally do alright.
 
This is why God invented the Army (and war).

You are either in school, in an apprenticeship, or in the Armed Forces.

Am I Politically Incorrect, or what??? :D

I agree with VY; active, engaged and properly mentored and supervised kids with interested parents/teachers/relatives will usually stop all that teenage rot.

Giving them a big pat on the back and a hug on a regular basis also helps.
 
Why not check out the Big Sister Big Brother program? I imagine there would be one running in WA.

It's a great program and gets involved with kids that are on the verge of ruining their lives. I mentored a young girl who had already been caught stealing or breaking into a car (can't remember) and I met her just after she had got caught; she was 14 at the time. I helped her through her conferencing sessions with the police and generally just hung out with her every week. Her mum was an alcoholic pot head and didn't really give a damn, and just didn't know how to deal with her.

9 years later, she's just blossomed into a wonderful young woman. She has a good steady job, and some clear direction in her life, and we still keep in touch when we can.

Blue Card, I've had similar thoughts you to about developing some sort of program for the really troubled kids. Get them working and learning and having people around them that care (and most importantly, can identify with the challenges that they are currently facing) and they really do respond well.

My idea involved getting them on building sites and working and getting skills and perhaps even a trade behind them, whilst at the same time being mentored in business, life, etc etc

Good luck
 
there is plenty that can be done for kids that can help troubled or not troubled kids.

in melbourne there is a group called REACH
set up by footballer jim stynes.

they have a huge premises now even for their groups and talks.

it has all sorts of activities and camps and courses for teens which teens love, and even preteens to help them learn all sorts of things like self confidence
talking seeing they are not alone if they have some problems, or divorced parents or whatever it is.

sometimes they have nights for parents with various topics about parenting or courses that have some nights for parents and some for teens also. the leaders from reach are young so can build a rapor and trust easily with these teens, they know how to talk with them and build a rapor that cant always be built with parents. i saw a family with a son who had a huge grafiti problem be helped alot by this course and another couple who were divorced both did the course to work in unison for the kids good. all types of families troubled and not troubled did the course.

there was a woman who used to do a different few day resilience courses in different states also for teaching skills to kids/teens, self confidence, problems resolution, communication , respect for parents, the importance of education, while having alot of fun . It turned kids from whatever path they were on to a better path in relationships respect education lifegoals.

there are some communities that have people who have done well who make scholarships where every year they sponsor a group of teens ( not necesarily troubled, but who's finanaces or family circumstances may impede their education). They might pay and certain amount towards school books, tuturing, computer or even hobbies and interests, passions. they might have monthly meetings with a good speaker on various topics and skills helpful for hobbies, or jobs, or study.We dont have to only sponsor children overseas. there could be families here on small incomes or one small income with extra burdens , struggling whose children can have an easier path with some support for school books, uniforms, camps, tutoring, hobbies that build self esteem, repairs, health needs, costly medications.

I know someone that once a year she searches out a sole parent or young mum or someone or some family in need to assist in some way that will make a difference immediately to them.

Kids who need support are everywhere for whatever reason. I personally have had living in my home 5 years ago 3 teens for short or long periods who would otherwise have been suicide cases. to help them be heard in their situation , to help them get school books, jobs, some peace when they couldnt get that in their homes for whatever reason was very important. One of my children tried to help a 4th child who stole from them and had to immediately leave. so some children are easier to help than others.

I once saw on Oprah a show about the importance of teaching kids that everyone has a path that they can follow for success in life using their individual gifts and talents.
but for some it was made very hard
eg one very smart boy was gifted in computers but couldnt spell so he failed exams because of spelling instead of ignoring the spelling and realising and encouraging his gifts. he ended up in jail and it was very sad because it should have been very different if they would have worked with his individual strengths and weaknesses and not been so rigid and blind.

There are many drug rehab places around and people dont succeed because drugs are often very hard to beat. I have never had this issue myself but i have learnt about it and seen many tv programs about it. It often takes a few times of trying rehab to succeed but each time the relapse might be less.

These places need funding often. I just received a leaflet about a trivia night one such organisation was having to raise funds. YOung people on drugs could feel they could never get off and that rehab doesnt work as they see so often people who relapse , but thats because they dont understand that it often takes a few times at rehab till you really can change your whole life which is what is needed. EAch time becomes easier and the relapse period can be shorter.

so look around and find what it is you want to do. the choices are many and well worth it. If you go in with a view to understand and help and be non judgemental it will help everyone.

As for the comment someone made that juvenile crime is a result of bad parenting. I think there are much more issues that contribute,
eg teens who wont obey a single rule and if they are say 14 the parents dont want to throw them out but short of throwing them out may have very little rights in their own home if the teen decides to thrawt every rule

teens want to fit in and bad friends can reek havoc, parents are no longer the only influence
there is a saying the apple doesnt fall far from the tree but in these troubled times its like a storm where the apples can fall very far from the tree.

kids in country towns may not have much to do and boredom can drive them to doing destructive things

drugs taking can start in all types of famililies for different reasons and once someone is on drugs many use crime to support the habit. very few manage to work and suppor their habit without stealing, losing friends and family , though there are those few who do manage to get on with family, keep jobs, have friends, study and not steal while on drugs.

I once read about a teacher who would really mentor his students and make them feel that whatever challenge came up in life toghether they would find a way past it.

I think there are alot of people , or teens who coudl do with that sort of mentorship as long as its done in a professional and very caring way that works with the persons needs and interests. some people want to help but are not really able to understand others needs or situations very well and rather than being helpful could just add more stress.

I also wonder why our schools teach alot of things that will never be used in real life , and yet we learn NOTHING about relationships, communication, choosing a good spouse, finances, investment, and attitudes needed to get through challenges or raising kids.
Francine.
 
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