How to fill and paint weatherboards

Hi all

So with a bit of time off over the next few weeks I'm going to tackle some sun-beaten weatherboards on my garage. They're west-facing and the paint is cracking, usual stuff. There are also areas which need filler, both surface and crack filler, although the boards themselves largely look ok-ish.

The total area is no more than 9-10 m2. It's not attached to the house and is only visible from the ROW at the back of the house, so it doesn't have to be the greatest job in the world, but does need to have good weather protection.

So, my plan of attack is to sand down the old paint, fill in the cracks with a crack filler, apply surface filler to the boards that need it (about 15% of the area), seal with a primer/undercoat then topcoat.

I'd appreciate any advice, on either the approach I'm taking or on choice of paints. I didn't grow up with weatherboards, so I've never had to paint/treat them before.

Cheers
Jonathon
 
Can you upload a picture of the weatherboards and the paint peeling please.
I'd like to have a look at it before I comment:)
 
Can you upload a picture of the weatherboards and the paint peeling please.
I'd like to have a look at it before I comment:)

Here are two pics, the one showing the surface damage is by far the worst bit, most of the surface is like the right hand side of the pic showing the join that needs filling.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0019.jpg
    IMG_0019.jpg
    14.4 KB · Views: 454
  • IMG_0024.jpg
    IMG_0024.jpg
    31.8 KB · Views: 423
Good photos Jonathon,
Its a simple enough job,

It will be hard to use a power sander on this as the shape is not flat.
Good thing there is only a small area to do as it is mostly a hand sand.
It doesn't look as if it is lead based paint underneath so that is good.

I would wash it down using a rag and water,lots of elbow grease.
Sugar soap is not needed.
Powder / colored water will come off it,make sure there is no powder left as paint will not stick to it.Start at the top and work down.

When dry just sand hard"with the grain" with 80 grit sandpaper
The area that has the grey timber can be sanded with a power sander as it is flatter.It will have to be sanded back to the fresh timber underneath or the paint will not stick to that either.

Punch your nails to below the surface and use an oil base putty to fill these.(Do not use water based putty as rust will eventually come out)

You do not need a primer,just apply one coat of exterior 100% Acrylic with 10 year guarantee,no primer required.There are lots available.I prefer solver Duraguard for many reasons.
Make sure you get the paint under the bottom edge.

Sand with 180 grit sandpaper after the first coat,gap the required areas with gap filler (No more gaps)
Apply your second coat,if you want to apply a third,go for it.
It cant hurt.:D



Please note:
The advise you receive from the salespeople from the paint shop will greatly differ from my advise,You decide who has the most experience and the most to gain from you buying something you don't actually need:D
 
pa1nter, I know it's not good for your business, but if you are not a painter and an investor, what do you think those cladding products on the market, are they any good ? I have few weatherboards and would like to fix the problem once and for all, rather than repaint every few years because the IPs are interstate.
 
pa1nter, I know it's not good for your business, but if you are not a painter and an investor, what do you think those cladding products on the market, are they any good ? I have few weatherboards and would like to fix the problem once and for all, rather than repaint every few years because the IPs are interstate.

I don't need the business and as a fellow investor I will give you an honest opinion.
Over the years I have come across many dozens of houses with cladding that look sad and run down only a few years after this stuff was fitted.
Several problems I have seen are

1:Fades
2:When damaged,cant be fixed
3:Same color every year,cant be spruced up
4:Still have to paint eves,gutters and trims,(I and other painters use to charge the same for a house with or without cladding:rolleyes:)
4:Spiders build up and cant be eradicated,they live in behind.
5:Creaks in the weather changes
6:Falls off when small fitting nails rust.
7:Lose house sales over it,people think of what could be the problem behind??

I believe a "good paint job" is far superior than cladding,(Not the handyman RE people)
That is stripped back and prepared properly,apply your three coats and 15 years before you touch it again;)

I would be happy to use it in the following areas.
1:Hard to reach areas,
2:Rotted weatherboards underneath
3:White ant repair
4:Featured areas

Hope this helps
 
Top