How to stop a noisy downpipe?

Couldn't figure out where to put this question, so here's as good as any.

We recently had new spouting and downpipes put on PPOR and the downpipe off the bullnose runs down to an right-angled elbow which is open, and directs the runoff to an open channel across the driveway.

Anyway, the water drops from the spouting to the elbow and hammers down on it - just like a dripping tap, only louder!

I've tried stuffing it with a rag, which deadens the sound (doesn't eliminate it) but the rag actually gets pushed out by the water. Anyone have any ideas or a magic product that will quieten this thing down?

Thanks.
 
I was going to suggest fashioning a curved floor for it out of putty but if you can buy something pre-made that's even better.
 
Ah, I get you now. The same principle as you see in tropical Queensland where they use chains instead of downpipes? But I have the tongue (of which I have some hanging in the garage) inside the downpipe!

I'll give it a go and let you know.
 
I can see how it WOULD work and I'll install it tonight to see. Seriously, though, even a heavy dew will cause some dripping. It is likely to work there, as well, or only when there's a water flow?
 
While you're there, try bracing the bit the water drips onto so it can't vibrate, since that is what is making the sound. Stuff rags or wrap some old foam on with cable ties all around the *outside* of that bit and you'll cut down the reverberation chamber effect, and the water won't wash it out.

At last resort, get plastic and paint it in a colourbond colour :p
 
If it rests against the inlet to the downpipe in the roof gutter the dribbles tend to follow the plastic strip to the bottom without dripping from the top, if you have heavier rain it will just run as normal.

You may still hear water flowing during normal rain but it should avoid the annoying drip, drip.:)
 
I wonder if changing the angle might work? So instead of the water hitting a horizontal surface it hits an angled one?

Or even take the angle out altogether?

Just thoughts.
 
While you're there, try bracing the bit the water drips onto so it can't vibrate, since that is what is making the sound. Stuff rags or wrap some old foam on with cable ties all around the *outside* of that bit and you'll cut down the reverberation chamber effect, and the water won't wash it out.
If it wasn't at the very front of the house in the most visually obvious spot, I'd probably try that.
At last resort, get plastic and paint it in a colourbond colour :p

Guess who has a tin of matching colorbond paint? :D Not bad.

I wonder if changing the angle might work? So instead of the water hitting a horizontal surface it hits an angled one?

Or even take the angle out altogether?

Just thoughts.

Thought about this too, but I'm worried I'll completely stuff it up, as I've never worked with colorbond and I don't have any spare bits. It's already on a bit of an angle.

Got a few things to work with now. Thanks all.
 
A very simple way that may work is slow down the flow rate,or install
45 d elbows instead of 90d ,or cut out a small section of gutter guard
and glue it too the dropper to slow the water flow,or reinstall a large
square dropper and reduce it back too 90mm..willair.
 
The yellow tongue is an excellent idea battler.

After popping in the yellow tongue, i'd also suggest running a thin ~3-5mm ring of silicon around the inside/on the inner wall near the top of the drain pipe, but not horizontal, i'd have this silicon ring at an angle, say ~30 degrees, with the lowest point making contact with the yellow tongue.

The idea is to try and eliminate the chance of any drips not making contat with the yellow tongue, and still hammering down to the bottom :mad:
The angled ring of silicon would be a guide for any slow drips, so that they actually do flow on to the yellow tongue.
 
The brains trust has come through. I reckon you're all on to something with this. Can't wait to get home and try it. And with the weather the way it is, I should be able to test if fairly soon, too!
 
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