I had a laugh this morning...

I went to the kids’ speech day at their school this morning. It’s a medium sized primary school – I’m guessing 400 kids. And there were about 50 parents there. The school orchestra was front and centre and the first thing we did was sing the national anthem.

Being a regular dad at these things, I knew what was coming.

Everyone launched into Advance Australia Fair, the adults with that sort of muted level of enthusiasm that Aussies have when we sing our national anthem (unless we’re at a sporting event where there is a chance we’ll win. Or we’re pissed).

The bloke two seats along from me was a tad more enthusiastic – maybe he knew his kid was going to win something.

He had a great tenor voice and really belted out that anthem – he would have been as loud as all the other parents combined.

At the end of the first verse, Kurt, the conductor, turned around slowly to face the audience.

I detected an ever so slight smile.

Then the orchestra and all the kids launched into the second verse.

I reckon maybe one in twenty adults know the second verse of the Advance Australia Fair.

I don’t.

The tenor two seats along doesn’t – I glanced along at the start of the second verse and he looked like he had sucked on a lemon.

I shook Kurt’s hand at the end of the morning, ‘Got em again, Kurt, well done.’
 
I didn't know it either... I got this from Wikipedia...

Australians all let us rejoice,
For we are young and free;
We've golden soil and wealth for toil;
Our home is girt by sea;
Our land abounds in nature's gifts
Of beauty rich and rare;
In history's page, let every stage
Advance Australia Fair.
In joyful strains then let us sing,
Advance Australia Fair.

Beneath our radiant Southern Cross
We'll toil with hearts and hands;
To make this Commonwealth of ours
Renowned of all the lands;
For those who've come across the seas
We've boundless plains to share;
With courage let us all combine
To Advance Australia Fair.
In joyful strains then let us sing,
Advance Australia Fair.
 
Most adults don't know it because I think it only became our national anthem in the mid 80s. It was God Save the Queen when I was at school.
 
And of course the song itself has 5 verses, but just the first and third verses comprise the national anthem.

On a related theme, I'm currently brushing up for the citizenship test, and if I want to embarrass my colleagues I just ask them questions from the test, like the date of Federation (about half get it withn 1 year of the actual date 1/1/1901), where the first Australian parliament was held (Exhibition building in Melbourne), etc.
 
On a related theme, I'm currently brushing up for the citizenship test, and if I want to embarrass my colleagues I just ask them questions from the test, like the date of Federation (about half get it withn 1 year of the actual date 1/1/1901), where the first Australian parliament was held (Exhibition building in Melbourne), etc.

Sheeh! I had to become a citizen a couple of years ago. British decendant, came here when I was 4 and never bothered previously. I didn't have to sit a test at all. Just some filling in of forms, then an awfully long wait, then go to the ceremony.
 
i know the second verse!

i sing it with my kids all the time.

however - i dind;t know it was an excert form another song.

there ya go!
 
Hilarious!!! Thanks for that.

I went to the kids’ speech day at their school this morning. It’s a medium sized primary school – I’m guessing 400 kids. And there were about 50 parents there. The school orchestra was front and centre and the first thing we did was sing the national anthem.

Being a regular dad at these things, I knew what was coming.

Everyone launched into Advance Australia Fair, the adults with that sort of muted level of enthusiasm that Aussies have when we sing our national anthem (unless we’re at a sporting event where there is a chance we’ll win. Or we’re pissed).

The bloke two seats along from me was a tad more enthusiastic – maybe he knew his kid was going to win something.

He had a great tenor voice and really belted out that anthem – he would have been as loud as all the other parents combined.

At the end of the first verse, Kurt, the conductor, turned around slowly to face the audience.

I detected an ever so slight smile.

Then the orchestra and all the kids launched into the second verse.

I reckon maybe one in twenty adults know the second verse of the Advance Australia Fair.

I don’t.

The tenor two seats along doesn’t – I glanced along at the start of the second verse and he looked like he had sucked on a lemon.

I shook Kurt’s hand at the end of the morning, ‘Got em again, Kurt, well done.’
 
Yeah teachers have to know it.
We had our presentation day on yesterday too. Pretty much the same thing.
poor Kindy kids. We only sing the first verse. When the band started playing the second verse they looked at me as if to say "what's going on?".
They tried hard though and joined in again at the chorus.
 
Yeah, the bloke near me got a bit of confidence back when the chorus rolled around. But he didn't crank the volume up quite as much. I imagined him thinking, 'God, I hope there's not a bloody third verse.'
 
I know both the verses - we learned it at school in the 1950s.
It wasn't the national anthem then but it was considered the national song.
And in those politically incorrect days the original first line was
"Australian sons let us rejoice....."
Marg
 
after 22 years absence i can still sing both verses of "god defend new zealand" :D

at juniors' school in south australia we adults were all very happy that the entire australian national anthem was printed out in large print and pinned above the stage in the hall.
 
Hehe cute story :)

Naturally, as an ex-teacher I well know both verses :D but luckily am no tenor so no-one has to listen to me belt it out! More kids who were taught in the late 1980's-early 90's know both verses best.
 
I know both the verses - we learned it at school in the 1950s.
It wasn't the national anthem then but it was considered the national song.
And in those politically incorrect days the original first line was
"Australian sons let us rejoice....."
Marg

not much different in the late 70's to the 80's either Marg when I went oto school and learned the same anthem... can't remember when they changed it to "Austrlia's sons " but I was tught it orignally "Australians all"

I know my parents knew both verses as well, from their little english classes and attending our school events.

Surprised that a friend of mine with 2 kids, one 16 and one 13 didnt kow the second anthem, ha she sort a challenged me on it with they dont sing that at the kids' school.."

Wonder how many of them with "F*** OFF WE"RE FULL" "LOVE IT OR LEAVE" know the second verse
 
Sheeh! I had to become a citizen a couple of years ago. British decendant, came here when I was 4 and never bothered previously. I didn't have to sit a test at all. Just some filling in of forms, then an awfully long wait, then go to the ceremony.

they changed the rules few years ago, apparently now you are supposed to know rules of cricket and all 3 footy codes if you want to become a citizen :D
 
and what year England joined the European Union

that was actually a question I failed in the mock test you could take online
 
I didn't know it either... I got this from Wikipedia...
Australians all let us rejoice,
For we are young and free;
We've golden soil and wealth for toil;
Our home is girt by sea;
Our land abounds in nature's gifts
Of beauty rich and rare;
In history's page, let every stage
Advance Australia Fair.
In joyful strains then let us sing,
Advance Australia Fair.

Beneath our radiant Southern Cross
We'll toil with hearts and hands;
To make this Commonwealth of ours
Renowned of all the lands;
For those who've come across the seas
We've boundless plains to share;
With courage let us all combine
To Advance Australia Fair.
In joyful strains then let us sing,
Advance Australia Fair.

I enjoy the Qantas ad (not when I sing it though)

I Still Call Australia Home’:D

I’ve been to cities that never close down
from New York to Rome and old London town,
but no matter how far or how wide I roam
I still call Australia home.

I’m always traveling, I love being free,
and so I keep leaving the sun and the sea,
but my heart lies waiting over the foam.
I still call Australia home.

All the sons and daughters spinning ’round the world,
away from their family and friends,
but as the world gets older and colder,
it’s good to know where your journey ends.

But someday we’ll all be together once more
when all of the ships come back to the shore.
Then I realise something I’ve always known.
I still call Australia home.
 
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