Médecins Sans Frontières

I came across this article written by someone working for Médecins Sans Frontières in PNG. The nurse mentioned in the article is me!
Just as she started there was a knock on the door. I went out to see the nurse of one of the local companies who had brought in a local community member. His hand was hanging on by a piece of skin only and he was shaking and bleeding on the trolley. I stuck my head into the OT to see they were still stitching up the first lady and advised them of what was to come. The man with 1 hand clearly could not wait outside so we moved him into another bed in the dressing room, which was now very busy and very bloody. The doctor took a look and quickly realised that we could not save his hand. I was sent to get another pair of bone cutters, more gauze and some more morphine and tried to empty the bins of blood-soaked clothes and gauze.
http://www.msf.org.au/from-the-fiel...log/article/logistician-in-png-last-days.html
 
That's cool. I donate monthly to this charity. It's the only charity that operates outside Aust that I give money to. Why? Because they do the job rather than use the job to promote a particular religion.
 
Great article, very interesting side to nursing. I can only imagine the new clinical skills you used over there. Are you still there, have you done lots of work for them? One day, the horrible teenagers will leave home and god willing I would like to do something like this to, although I am a bit of a scaredy cat. Did you feel safe?

Thanks for sharing.
 
Reading a book written about the time of WWI and wars closely afterward. Decriptions of the same thing through the eyes of soldiers and medical staff (who weren't always available).

Sad thing is, that we think we're better than previous generations who perpertrated that stuff..

just goes to show...
 
I can only imagine the new clinical skills you used over there. Are you still there, have you done lots of work for them? One day, the horrible teenagers will leave home and god willing I would like to do something like this to, although I am a bit of a scaredy cat. Did you feel safe?
I am not actually working for MSF but for an oil & gas company. I refer patients to them though. We can't have too much contact with MSF because they have to remain independant (but our company does donate all the fuel for the hospital generator). I have still learnt a heap of skills in the 4 years I have been over here (4 weeks on and 4 weeks off). The security is actually really good and I feel very safe. When MSF had issues with security (above article) they pulled out. Most locals appreciate that you are there to help them and are really good. They usually fight between themselves about land, women (one man I met has 16 wives!) or pigs. Alcohol is a major issue and adds to the fights. When the man had his hand amputated (by his friend in the same tribe) the issue was over a woman.

Overall, it is very safe though.
 
Good on you, yo yo ma, it's truly amazing work that you are doing, and MSF is indeed an admirable organisation.
 
That's cool. I donate monthly to this charity. It's the only charity that operates outside Aust that I give money to. Why? Because they do the job rather than use the job to promote a particular religion.

+1

Also worth noting the Red Cross is in the same category
 
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