Mould...

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From: Anonymous


Help needed - others may have come up against this with the recent rains we've had.

Black specks have appeared on a ceiling in one of my properties - does this mean a roof is leaking? - as it doesn't appear to be. Or could it just be condensation? Any tips on how I prevent it? I know you can treat the area before you re-paint it, but I don't really want to re-decorate.

Not knowing the answer has shamed me into anonymity....
 
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Reply: 1
From: Michael Croft


What type of roof do you have?

Is there insulation in it?

Where is the property (climatic region)?

Michael Croft
 
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Reply: 1.1
From: Anonymous


The roof is tile - there is no insulation - climate wise it is NSW coastal - so frequently rainy, especially this February.

I am maintaining anonymity...
 
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Reply: 1.1.1
From: Michael Croft


If the ceiling is plasterboard it is most likely surface mould; does it wipe off with a wet cloth? This is caused by wet weather/damp conditions and closed windows. The spots are usually distinct and have defined edges and are widely spread over large area of ceiling. Solution = open windows (particularly if a bedroom)and wipe with bleach solution (exit mould).

The other possibility is a cracked roof tile or two and the plaster is getting damp (but not enough to drip). In this case it may not wipe off with a damp cloth. This mould has less defined edges and is usually localized. Solution = replace the tile and let area dry out and repaint (having killed mould with bleach solution).

If the room is a wet area install a ceiling or wall vent/fan, preferably vented to atmosphere.

Michael Croft
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1
From: Manny B


If it is mould, there are anti-mould chemicals you can add in your paint (any reputable paint shop would have it). Once you wipe the mould clean (as per Michael's reply), just paint over it & the anti-mould agent would help eliminate this problem. Also, if there are no air vents in the room, you may want to place one on the wall close to the mouldy spot (if the windows in the room aren't frequently opened)...

Cheers,

Manny.
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1
From: Michael Croft


Yep, forgot to mention the anti mould agents added to paint. Very toxic, so handle with great care, but should prevent the mould coming back in between the old and new paint (the cause of some delamination problems). Better yet get your paint store to throw it in for free as a bonus. It's not so effective on new surface mould, the vent is the best solution there. They used to make a ducted small whirlybird air extractor type thingy for bathrooms - very effective and highly recommended, cost about $129 a few years back, installation about $60 or DIY.

Michael Croft
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1
From: Anonymous


Manny / Michael - thanks for your help. If we meet up on a future pub crawl I'll know who you are and there's a beer in it for you...
 
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