Noise above in multi story unit complex

Hi all,

Just moved into my new joint which a a 14 story unit. I'm hearing the regular squelch noise like someone is backing out of their chair or pushing a table across the floor in the morning and at night. Sometime sis frequent as in 5 or 6 times within a 5 minute period.

I also hear walking and the occasional bang noise like they hit someone against a wall or drop something heavy. I def thought the unit above had floating boards until I paid a visit the other day.

They have carpet but the underlay in the carpet has pretty much had it so it's pretty much like 10 year old carpet against the concrete slab. It's pretty hard when you bang on the carpet. I looked around and the only chairs I could see not on carpet are on the tiles beside the kitchen area which didn't seem to be the issue. With tiles cemented onto the concrete slab, could this be the issue? But I hear this at both ends of the unit like it occurring in bed room and over the other wide where their dining table is.

I'm starting to think it could be the floor below? Can sound in these complexes play tricks on your ears? I even visited the apartment upstairs that wasn't directly above me who has boards but they seem to be very extra careful and said they don't even touch their dining table at all.

Is this acceptable noise to hear footsteps when they stomp, frequent banging noise and furniture moving. By the way, with 10 year old carpet and pretty much no underlay left, does this breech a bylaw in that they do not have the sufficient underlay? My new carpet has thick underlay and even if I had boots on and stomped my feet, it doesn't even penetrate to the concrete slab.

Last note is there is peace at around 10:30pm to about 6am when everyone is in bed.
 
If it's Meriton built, the noise could be coming from next door.
I even put my ear on the floating floor I have and can hear the noice travel through my floor.
I am certain the walking is from the above unit given their next to nothing underlay, they are pretty much walking on the concrete slab, but the furniture dragging noice is really annoying.

The walking you can live with but the furniture noise needs to stop. I've got padding to offer them but need to track down who it is.
 
Thing is the neighbour probably doesn't even realise. It might even an office type chair with wheels.

My bedroom (when i lived in a unit) was next to the neighbours kitchen. Through a firerated wall I could hear them chopping on the chopping board.

These new style units have f'all noise insulation. For all you know there might be things you are doing that are affect other people and you don't even know it.

Its the joys of apartment living.

PS: This could also explain why they were so anal towards you about the underlay. Its probably something thats been brought up before.
 
I even put my ear on the floating floor I have and can hear the noice travel through my floor.
I am certain the walking is from the above unit given their next to nothing underlay, they are pretty much walking on the concrete slab, but the furniture dragging noice is really annoying.

The walking you can live with but the furniture noise needs to stop. I've got padding to offer them but need to track down who it is.
If they aren't aware of it, they'll keep doing it. Maybe a polite chat might help. However keep in mind that you can't make them change their carpet... that's just not reasonable.... what would you say if someone told you your underlay was worn down and that it needed to be replaced. Just know that things can go south real fast.
 
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We have two units in a company title block . It's a 1930's block and Has fairly springy wooden floor boards . They big units and would be easy to reconfigure but repositioning rooms would put kitchens / bathrooms above bedrooms / living areas and the board is strongly opposed to any changes in layout . In companies , they have more power to oppose changes .

I've spent a fair bit of time researching sound proofing on units and it's a very problematic area . There are lots of different proposed solutions , but knowing how they will work until they are installed is difficult .

You can intall false ceilings . Gyprock have products designed to decrease sound transmission .


http://www.ocn.org.au* - Owners corporation*network
http://www.flat-chat.com.au* - Flat Chat*

http://www.flat-chat.com.au/timber-floors-facts-and-frictions/
http://www.flat-chat.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Acoustic-ratings-floors.pdf

This one goes into a fair amount of detail with various suggestions about acceptable noise levels in different situations
http://ocn.org.au/book/export/html/1200

http://www.buildreport.com.au/2003-december-acoustic-ratings-building-report-sydney.html

All the reading I've done on noise transmission indicates the best solution is being on good terms with your neighbours and making them Aware of the problem and hoping they are accommodating ...

Cliff
 
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