Paint Gun??

From: Glenn Mott


I am about to paint a property and was wondering if anyone had used an airless spray gun like Geoff Doidge does and what the results are??

Did you hire or buy??

Glenn
 
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Reply: 1
From: Paul Roberts


Hired one to paint the interior of a new house. Worked great for the undercoat, but poor finish for main colour. Personally didn't like it. Fast and probably good in experienced hands but not for me. Geoff does say to roller it afterwards to catch the runs and give a better finish.
I have gone on to do other reno's and prefer to use a 'Paint Stick'. Available at Bunnings etc its like a large syringe attached to a paint roller. Gives a great finish, is fast and cheap - about $70.00 when I bought it. We have 2 now and can nail a house real fast with a quality finish.
I think an airless spray gun is faster in the right hands, but you still have to roll it, then there is the extra preparation, pick up and return, etc to be allowed for. The other thing I found was the gun used a lot of paint.
Horses for courses but I will stick to my paint stick. Less fuss, less bother and good finish.
 
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Reply: 2
From: Adam Randall


I have a Wagner 400, and have to agree, as I do not use it very often. The preparation is the part I do not like. I also agree that a certain amount of skill (which I don't have ) is required to operate it properly
 
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Reply: 1.1
From: Manny B


Hi Paul,

I've always used a simply roller for my walls/ceilings, using some of the tricks my dad passed on to me (as he was a painter)... Does the "paint stick" make the job quicker or easier? I assume the paint stick you are referring to allows you to fill the container (which is part of the roller) with paint, which may last for a couple of walls? If so, wouldn't it be heavy when doing ceilings? (I get sore shoulders just doing the ceilings with just the roller)...

Any info would be greatly appreciated, as I'm always open to try new gadgets & if it can save me time, even better...

In terms of spray guns, one of my tenants is a painter for Henley homes (I think he does some Simmonds ones as well) & he told me he uses a spray gun BUT one of his contractors normally follows along behind him with a roller to get a better finish... he said it saves them lots of time... I must say I haven't used one & don't intend to... sticking with what I know...

Cheers,

Manny.
 
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Reply: 2.1
From: Kristine .


Adam

You mentioned you have a K'archer high pressure water unit. Apart from the obvious, what have you used this for? Have you used the detergent attachment? Do you have an extension wand? Have you used it inside the house??

I'm intending to buy one - what model is yours, and is it strong enough / more than you need? Any good for high walls - safe to hold while on a ladder? How about up in the roof cavity of an unlined garage?

I'm also seriously considering getting a K'archer steam unit, primarily for painting preparation as steam won't leave any residue. Also for softening wallpaper, cleaning light fittings, nooks and crannies, and for cleaning tile grouting, shower recess framing, that sort of fiddly stuff that takes a lot of time, but if is really clean gives a great result.

As I'm about to start on a job not quite as big as yours, but a complete house overhaul nonetheless, any tips regarding equipment would be gratefully received.

Your photos have been inspirational!!

Cheers

Kristine
 
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Reply: 2.1.1
From: Adam Randall


Hello Kristine
I have found the Karcher pressure gun to be fantastic, the model I have is the 200+ and cost me $185 from bunnings. I think its operating pressure is about 1450psi. I have only got the wand that came with it. For what I have to do this is all I need. The top end models can cost over $1000, and Im sure if you want to punch holes through concrete they would be worth the money. The pressure is not a problem when holding the wand, not much more than a garden hose. I have not used the detergent feeder yet.
I have put some more pictures in of my current progress, including the roof I cleaned. I stopped doing this initially because I thought no-one looked at them.
Also If you read this Glenn Mott, I cannot send email at the moment so cannot reply to yours. I paid about $400 for the wagner spray gun, It is worth the extra money for the electronic flow control. I have not painted walls with it, I painted my doors, and the finish was great, its masking all the glass etc that has do be done with a sprayer that is not fun. I prefer to scrape off any mistakes I make than prevent them, as I find it takes less time.
 
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Reply: 3
From: Glenn Mott


Thanks for the reply Adam...

Since when did Kaz stop people relaying mail??? (joke)

Glenn
 
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Reply: 1.1.1
From: Paul Roberts


I find the Paint Stick is easier to use and is quicker. When full, it is not excessively heavy at all. It covers a good size area, unsure of area size ?10m2. For ceilings it has an extension which makes it easier on those shoulder/neck muscles. Like I said, I'm no professional and don't have painting trade experience or tips but for a bushy painter it works well.
 
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Reply: 3.1
From: Kristine .


Has anyone tried cling film (Glad Wrap) for masking windows when painting?

I agree with Adam (thanks for the info) regarding windows - by the time you've gone around with the masking tape, it's probably quicker (given that the windows will need washing anyway) to scrape the glass down after painting.

As far as switch covers are concerned, I was very dissapointed when professional painters once just painted over the switches. I would have thought a trade job would have paid more attention to detail. Oh, well (sigh).

I intend to fix chair rails and picture/plate rails in this house, and it would make sense to cut and paint them before fixing. Also, I don't have to be exact when painting the join between the dado and the upper wall that way, as it will be covered later.

Someone has mentioned a Dulux paint 'industrial' grade. Can anyone give me any details on this? I'm quite prepared (erk) to prime, base, and two top coats on the timber (architraves, rails, window frames etc) to achieve the gloss finish, but if I don't have to I can put the time and effort to better use.

Cheers

Kristine
 
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