Regrets and mistakes.

I reckon we all might be able to learn from the experiences of one another.

What are your big regrets (including things you DIDN'T do and wish you did), and mistakes?

Property, investing and life in general.

If you're one of those "positive thinking" types who has no regrets and doesn't make mistakes (just learning experiences), pretend that's what I asked :)
 
Three ... not buying and holding those stock standard, basic properties that were paying for themselves - instead I'd take the quick capital gain ... could be fully retired on healthy income if we'd held.

... moving into development at the peak of the 2003/4 market and having to sell up nearly everything during the following crash. Lost us around $300,000

... not ignoring hubby's ex-wife (and mother to his children) when she was being a complete b**ch ... she was an expert at manipulating everything so the kids would only see my biting back, not her initial underhanded nastiness.
 
1. Starting earlier in property investment. Didn't buy my first property till 28 even with solid income and good savings many years before then.

2. Not walking away from losers in the stock market due to emotion. Lost more than 6 figures over 2-3 years due to this. Bloody stupid, but a VERY good lesson in how easy it is to lose money if you're not careful and structured in the way you invest.
 
I regret not getting a profession. Sort of. I wouldn't be married to my husband, or living here in Spain, if I had just finished uni and got a job. But I do envy my friends the depth of knowledge they have in their various fields, and their earning capacity.

I regret one bad relationship in my 20s (doesn't everyone?).

I also regret opening a real forex account this week after only 2 days of demo trading. I practically wiped the whole account. I feel like a real goose, and a bit ashamed too, because I know I made some decisions with a gamblers mindset - trying to make up losses, holding onto a losing position because I didn't want to take the loss, etc., etc.. Silver lining is I only used a few hundred dollars (I'm not that silly) and I learnt a big lesson - I'm not nearly as calm and rational under pressure and I thought I would be. And I'm usually a very calm and rational person.
 
I didn't have more children.

I wanted 12 ...

 
I also regret opening a real forex account this week after only 2 days of demo trading. I practically wiped the whole account. I feel like a real goose, and a bit ashamed too, because I know I made some decisions with a gamblers mindset - trying to make up losses, holding onto a losing position because I didn't want to take the loss, etc., etc.. Silver lining is I only used a few hundred dollars (I'm not that silly) and I learnt a big lesson - I'm not nearly as calm and rational under pressure and I thought I would be. And I'm usually a very calm and rational person.

I don't think you should regret this, use it as a learning opportunity.
 
What are your big regrets (including things you DIDN'T do and wish you did), and mistakes?

Property, investing and life in general.

If you're one of those "positive thinking" types who has no regrets and doesn't make mistakes (just learning experiences), pretend that's what I asked :)

I must be the +ve thinking type - I look back and see a lot of learning experiences!

Topping these would be:
- tree plantations....
- some them structured product things
- using borrowed money as collateral to borrow more money


Regrets - yes actually do have some of these though - but not related to investment...

Biggest regret - buying a 2nd hand Galant VR4, instead of paying a bit more and getting a brand new Lancer GSR for my track events. I saw the Galant as "tried and tested" whereas the Lancer looked too small (with a smaller engine etc). Big mistake. While the Galant was packed with technology (passive 4 wheel steer, a very sophisticated AWD for its time) the Lancer was going to be much "lighter" on the wallet due to being kinder on tyres and brakes. The Galant managed to rip through 3 sets of tyres per year (on about 60 race track laps per year), and about as many brake discs (discs wore faster than the hi tech ceramic pads on the car).

The Y-man
 
My regrets centre around not correctly placing the boundary between:

"persisting and trying to turn things around"

and

"time to cut losses"

Persistence is a valuable quality. So is knowing when it's best to quit while you're "only a bit behind" and living to fight another day.
 
1. Experimenting with these stocks:
AQP
BLY
NWH

Basically 80% is wiped out. Now, there is no point in "cutting losses".

2. Not working in overseas before kids.

3. Not getting into high level physical activities during 20s. I'm talking about sports here :p

I have a habit of asking the same question who are 10 years ahead of me. Then try to see if I would feel that way in 10 years time. If yes then try to make the right changes now.
 
After losing both parents and a loved aunt over the space of two years, I tend to look at small things that once would have sent me into a spin and now run them past the "did anybody die" test. If the answer is "no" I don't worry nearly as much about them as I would once have done.
 
I have a habit of asking the same question who are 10 years ahead of me. Then try to see if I would feel that way in 10 years time. If yes then try to make the right changes now.

This sounds sensible. Can you give me an example or two?
I'm the other way around, tend to be 10 years behind (or more).
 
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