Hi,

I've recently moved into my apartment I bought and I want to knock down a wall . I've already been in the ceiling and it's not a load bearing wall which is good news. I found out the next door neighbors also knocked that wall out when they renovated.
I called strata today to find out the process . She said I will have to get a DA and it will have to be signed off by a structural engineer.

So I'm just wondering from people who have done this before, how long does the DA usually take and how much would the engineer cost.??

I will be doing the demoloshing and everything else myself .

Cheers
 
I am undertaking the same process currently also. I have structural engineer drawing up plans (walls are load bearing, however can place beams in place of walls from his recommendation). I dont understand why it has anything to do with council for DA?

Please correct me if i am wrong, but assuming it is an internal wall and not increasing bedroom count then isnt Structural Engineer and qualified builder enough?!?!

I have EGM meeting next week, and have today (contacted strata sec. about my plans to get him across it early).

Also interested in other responses, opinions.
 
Hi,

I've recently moved into my apartment I bought and I want to knock down a wall . I've already been in the ceiling and it's not a load bearing wall which is good news. I found out the next door neighbors also knocked that wall out when they renovated.
I called strata today to find out the process . She said I will have to get a DA and it will have to be signed off by a structural engineer.

So I'm just wondering from people who have done this before, how long does the DA usually take and how much would the engineer cost.??

I will be doing the demoloshing and everything else myself .

Cheers

Get the approval from "strata" in writing before doing anything.

If the apartment is under strata title (which your post suggests) then most likely you don't own the walls, ceiling or floor -- only the air space between. The walls, ceiling and floor are owned by the body corporate or owners corporation. You'll need their permission to do anything to them, technically even to drill a hole for a screw to hang a picture.

The owners corporation has the right to say "no" to your plans, even if they comply to council requirements.
 
If it's internal you don't need to go through the (lengthy) DA process.

You still need to get the strata approval but you can run it through Part 4 of the Exempt and Complying Development Codes as complying development.

Internal alterations apply to both stand alone houses as well as units and townhouses.

Should save you a fair whack of time and money.
 
The Part 4 Exempt and Complying Development Codes is to do with council approval isn't it?

If the strata says NO then the development is nixed regardless of it being exempt and complying with council, internal or external or whatever. The strata OWN the building structure and the owners corporation as a group get to decide what happens to it, not the council.

Propertunity posted a link to an excellent thread that discussed the "what's in it for the strata to approve the development" issues. It makes interesting reading.
 
The Part 4 Exempt and Complying Development Codes is to do with council approval isn't it?

If the strata says NO then the development is nixed regardless of it being exempt and complying with council, internal or external or whatever. The strata OWN the building structure and the owners corporation as a group get to decide what happens to it, not the council.

Propertunity posted a link to an excellent thread that discussed the "what's in it for the strata to approve the development" issues.

It's to do with approval. Not just council approval.

Basically, instead of lodging a full DA with council, going through neighbour notification, facing refusal because some old biddy down the street doesn't like it, you can go through a private certifier or council certifier.

Provided you meet the standards you are going to get an approval in about 10 days. No ifs, not buts.

But as I said, yes, you do need strata approval first and foremost. I was referring to the comment about needing a DA.
 
Hi,

I've recently moved into my apartment I bought and I want to knock down a wall . I've already been in the ceiling and it's not a load bearing wall which is good news. I found out the next door neighbors also knocked that wall out when they renovated.
I called strata today to find out the process . She said I will have to get a DA and it will have to be signed off by a structural engineer.

So I'm just wondering from people who have done this before, how long does the DA usually take and how much would the engineer cost.??

I will be doing the demoloshing and everything else myself .

Cheers

wonder what has to do with a DA, i have done this numerous times with permit in victoria. Normally - depending on how old your apartment is, you can purchase the original architect's plans from the council which takes 2 weeks to search of you may buy them from the architect.

If not, you will need a structural engineer to do an assessemnt, it could take anything btw of $500-$1500 for a report to satisfy the owners corporation.

normally if the wall is hanging off a dropped ceiling it definitely isn't load bearing however be careful not to take out other load bearing walls if you're not sure get a builder and if they're any electrical cables, get it disconnected first.

also be aware of sprinkler or fire safety issues as they get dangerous to deal with.
 
wonder what has to do with a DA, i have done this numerous times with permit in victoria. Normally - depending on how old your apartment is, you can purchase the original architect's plans from the council which takes 2 weeks to search of you may buy them from the architect.

If not, you will need a structural engineer to do an assessemnt, it could take anything btw of $500-$1500 for a report to satisfy the owners corporation.

normally if the wall is hanging off a dropped ceiling it definitely isn't load bearing however be careful not to take out other load bearing walls if you're not sure get a builder and if they're any electrical cables, get it disconnected first.

also be aware of sprinkler or fire safety issues as they get dangerous to deal with.

NSW has different planning legislation to Victoria.
 
Thanks for the quick replies

Here is the letter the strata sent me


If you’re planning to knock down walls, I will need the followings to be submitted:
*
1.**** Your application in writing
2.**** Scope of works
3.**** A Structural Engineer’s certificate to confirm that the proposed renovation by knocking down the walls will not interfere with the structural integrity of the building
4.**** Development Application
5.**** Sketch Plan / Architect Drawing
*
On receipt of the required documentations, I’ll run a Paper Meeting for voting by the Executive Committee.
*
Regards
*

So this obviously answers the question of whether or not I need DA approval.

Does anyone know how much it will be and how long it will take . Also there is 12 units in my block . If 1 of them say no to the proposal is that enough to stop it or does it have to be a certain percentage of people ?
 
Does anyone know how much it will be and how long it will take . Also there is 12 units in my block . If 1 of them say no to the proposal is that enough to stop it or does it have to be a certain percentage of people ?

Read the strata rules. They will specify the type of meeting, who can vote and the size of majority needed.

They will also specify the quorum needed to be a valid meeting and most likely the procedure to move the process forward if a quorum cannot be found (this stops people from nixing everything by not turning up to meetings). Such process take time because adequate notification must be given to all stakeholders, typically 14 days.
 
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