reno licensing

Hi, just joined and thought I'd say hello.

I've just bought a pretty dated brick highset earmarked for a $50-75,000 6 month modernising reno with me doing the bulk of the work, and then resell. I'm a qualified (formally) builder from the UK and could probably get a QLD builders licence after jumping through a few hoops, however I'm then faced with the problem of being responsible for all the work carried out (even by other trades) for over 6 years after the sale. I also have to insure the work in case I go bust mid-job so it can be fininshed by others :confused: :) and may have to have a contract with myself also.

This is pretty offputting as poor maintenance/wear and tear and accidents by the new owners could bounce back to me in the future, I'm thinking maybe just get an owner builders licence for this one and see how it goes, but you can only have one every 6 years I believe.

I'm wondering how other builders/tradies deal with there own properties or any general thought's or licence experiences from anyone.

thanks
 
As an owner builder you take on the role as the builder so in essence you are still responsible for the work as per the same for a registered building practitioner.
In addition if you sell, you will need to take out insurance which is to cover the work for that 6 year period.

There are also rules as to how many properties you can build over a certain timeframe for owner builders. The reason for this is because the owner builder road is not intended to be a means for business.

Hope that helps somewhat.
 
As an owner builder you take on the role as the builder so in essence you are still responsible for the work as per the same for a registered building practitioner.
In addition if you sell, you will need to take out insurance which is to cover the work for that 6 year period.

Hope that helps somewhat.

Thanks, not sure about other states but the ruling for QLD is that the BSA won't warranty OB work and a statement has to be put into the sale as a clause advising purchasers along with a warning that the work is not insured, the purchaser has to sign it and give you a copy. If you don't then you are deemed to have given the purchaser a full warranty and are effectively liable if anything go's wrong down the track.

I have heard that OB permitted work has been a deal breaker in some sales due to this warning. Seems pretty overboard considering it will most likely have been certified and inspected by council anyway.
 
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