Single Bedroom Dwellings in WA?

I've had in my a head a bit of an "out-there" idea for a starting development in WA. Basically the short of it is to find a low-density lot and use the zoning concessions to subdivide and build 2 single bedroom dwellings in a duplex. So each house would have its own yard and street frontage ideally.

Needless to say, I was pretty excited about the new Rcode changes which bring the maximum internal area to 70sqm. I just think it would be possibly to design something to use that space really well.

I think the biggest x-factor is whether there would be any demand for the product. My personal views are that there must be a market of buyers that prefer a house/duplex over a unit for whatever reason, but are otherwise happy to accept only one bedroom.

Anyone have any input or thoughts about the feasibility? Or seen it done before?
 
I think there would be a market for it - but it definitely would take a lot of DD. I'm tossing up whether better to do it on higher density or lower.

I've been musing it. I was looking at a larger block the other day which could have done 3 blocks and one single dwelling block.

At 70sqm I'm wondering where the grey areas are to try and include a 'study/dining room which can be closed off' or something similar so it's still a one bedroom according to council but actually rentable as a 2 bedroom.
 
Loft mezzanine bedroom/study? ;)
Well 70sqm is actually plenty for a 2bd x 2bath apartment :) So I'm thinking that you have one of those bedrooms joined to the living area so that it's a dining room or theatre with double cavity slider or something like that.

Just needs some imagination :D

This is the ground floor of Highgate. Imagine no wardrobe and putting a double door where the wardrobe was. The whole ground floor is 80sqm and that is including those store rooms and foyer so 70sqm is very doable.
 

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Statistics show that single person households are one of the fastest growing demographics.

Having said that, I would feel a second bedroom is probably a good thing for visitors, study, bookshelves, etc.
Marg
 
I've had in my a head a bit of an "out-there" idea for a starting development in WA. Basically the short of it is to find a low-density lot and use the zoning concessions to subdivide and build 2 single bedroom dwellings in a duplex. So each house would have its own yard and street frontage ideally.

Needless to say, I was pretty excited about the new Rcode changes which bring the maximum internal area to 70sqm. I just think it would be possibly to design something to use that space really well.

I think the biggest x-factor is whether there would be any demand for the product. My personal views are that there must be a market of buyers that prefer a house/duplex over a unit for whatever reason, but are otherwise happy to accept only one bedroom.

Anyone have any input or thoughts about the feasibility? Or seen it done before?
1. Who would single bedroom properties appeal too?
2. Would they want a yard?



Statistics show that single person households are one of the fastest growing demographics.

Having said that, I would feel a second bedroom is probably a good thing for visitors, study, bookshelves, etc.
Marg
+1 :D
 
1. Who would single bedroom properties appeal too?
2. Would they want a yard?
A fast-growing demographic is independent seniors that live alone.

Particularly women who outlive men.

Single level properties are ideal because there's no steps to climb.

1br is fine provided there's plenty of storage and a reasonable kitchen. A sofa bed in the lounge allows room for visitors to stay over.

And the small yard allows scope for a few pot plants, garden and outdoor living.
 
A fast-growing demographic is independent seniors that live alone.

Particularly women who outlive men.

Single level properties are ideal because there's no steps to climb.

1br is fine provided there's plenty of storage and a reasonable kitchen. A sofa bed in the lounge allows room for visitors to stay over.

And the small yard allows scope for a few pot plants, garden and outdoor living.
Plus their cat or dog :D
 
apartment with a courtyard - nothing wrong with that concept at all.

54% of the population live in single or two person households, yet people continue to think there's no market for this type of product.
 
my recollection of the report 'the way we want to live' or whatever it was called was that 1x1's were not the way to go
that report had to be read in context imo. also, ABS estimates single person households to be nearly 30% within next 10 or so years.

i think well designed 1 bedders will be a huge market moving forward, so much so that im developing some atm.
 
I agree actually... my experience saw huge demand for 1x1s in the past and the report confused me, so much that I questioned the entire validity of it.
 
my recollection of the report 'the way we want to live' or whatever it was called was that 1x1's were not the way to go
It's probably true that a lot of fit/active retirees like to remain in their 3-4br suburban homes for as long as possible. And maybe a slightly smaller villa or townhouse after that.

However there is still a substantial minority who would be happy in a well-located spacious 1br unit. Let's say they're 5% of the population, which accounts for tens of thousands of people.

Perth (and Bunbury, Geraldton, Albany etc) has relatively few 1br dwellings. Far less than Sydney or Melbourne. After you take out the 1br units that are overseas student dogboxes or the clapped out high-rises in Vic Park the number is even less.

So while it's true that the majority probably don't want to live in a 1br unit, the small number of quality choices for those that do might still mean opportunities for someone.

Especially in smaller towns where the single person only has the choice of a cheap asbestos place or a nice brick home - both on a full quarter acre block which is too much looking after. Well appointed and cooled units should rent well in such places.
 
that report had to be read in context imo. also, ABS estimates single person households to be nearly 30% within next 10 or so years.

i think well designed 1 bedders will be a huge market moving forward, so much so that im developing some atm.
That's my thoughts exactly, and my anecdotal research suggests that a 1br house or duplex with a backyard and garden might fulfill some unmet demand in particular.

Sigh, now to find a block that supports a "proof of concept" duplex development...
 
It's probably true that a lot of fit/active retirees like to remain in their 3-4br suburban homes for as long as possible. And maybe a slightly smaller villa or townhouse after that.
Many will hold the family home as long as possible but in the end the maintenance is too much and the attraction of a smaller place grows. Just watched it happen for grandparents x8. The conclusion after some yrs in the unit (15 for the early adopters and 5 for those that stayed in the family home longer) is the nursing home after the unit no longer suits. Its demographics and it will march on regardless of opinion.
 
should u want finance for such a beast, be aware that the valuer may not share the view, and class the prop as "restricted security" meaning low lvrs

ta
rolf
 
Anyone else built a 70 sqm SBD before ?

Anyone on somersoft built a 70 sqm single bed dwelling unit behind a house?

I'm searching on somersoft to see if others have done what i'll be doing. I've only managed to find people developing regular size houses though.

Keen to hear from others!


I've had in my a head a bit of an "out-there" idea for a starting development in WA. Basically the short of it is to find a low-density lot and use the zoning concessions to subdivide and build 2 single bedroom dwellings in a duplex. So each house would have its own yard and street frontage ideally.

Needless to say, I was pretty excited about the new Rcode changes which bring the maximum internal area to 70sqm. I just think it would be possibly to design something to use that space really well.

I think the biggest x-factor is whether there would be any demand for the product. My personal views are that there must be a market of buyers that prefer a house/duplex over a unit for whatever reason, but are otherwise happy to accept only one bedroom.

Anyone have any input or thoughts about the feasibility? Or seen it done before?
 
Alex

Here in sydney I have built two bed granny flats 60sq metres. I think 70sq m is huge for a one bedder and with a flexible floor plan as suggested you may not limit your market.

I agree with the demographics changing and there has been demand for one bed apartments, this may well be a gap in the market.
 
1. Who would single bedroom properties appeal too?
2. Would they want a yard?
Once the kids have left home, I'd love to have a small home; I really hate having unutilised space. I fantasise about living in a much smaller but well-designed and 100% utilised space.

I'd still want a yard, though, as I love to garden. Space around me outside is where I can put more garden and get more fresh air and enjoy more beautiful views; extra space inside is just more space that I have to heat/cool, clean, and - most of all - avoid becoming a dump for stuff from other parts of the house.

I want the enforced discipline of only having what I need, and everything having a place, and everything having to actually be in its place. Too much space encourages untidiness.
 
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