Sub Letting double standard

Has anyone else picked up on this clause from the renting guide?

The tenant must get the landlord’s or
agent’s written permission before
assigning or sub-letting the premises
or any part of the premises.

The landlord or agent must give
permission for the tenant to sub-let
the premises unless there is a good
reason to refuse. It is illegal to charge
a fee for giving permission.
If a tenant believes a landlord or agent
is withholding consent unreasonably,
they can apply to the Victorian Civil &
Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) for a
ruling.

Where a tenant is living in public
housing, the landlord is generally
permitted to refuse consent.

To me it seems that this nation founded by the importation of convicts just ended up at parliament house to setup their criminal cartels who cater for their favourite special interest groups.

I am beyond outraged at this fact that when it comes to public housing it's 'generally' refused however the private sector can have all the grief when it all ends in tears after sub letting almost always goes pear shape.

Is there anyway to bypass the government laws when writing up a tenancy lease banning this practice and gain some real control over our lives instead of the pretend liberty this gubberment presents to us?
 
Has anyone else picked up on this clause from the renting guide?
Yes......old news.;)

Is there anyway to bypass the government laws when writing up a tenancy lease banning this practice and gain some real control over our lives instead of the pretend liberty this gubberment presents to us?
Yes - bypassing laws is typically called acting illegally. Do it at your own peril.

Look, at the end of the day, collectively, we as a nation, voted in a socialist government - state & federal - what do you expect? :confused:
 
I apologise if my venting comes off as extreme however;

I am in the process of putting my PPOR on the market for lease, after seeing many houses in my area vacant I used to think, how could anyone who has an asset that can provide a roof over ones head and increase the quality of life to such a high standard go to waste?

After living next door to a sole commission house in one of Victoria's most exclusive suburbs for many years and seeing how the scum in this society are the majority I finally realise why people buy investment properties and leave them vacant.

Reading the below article as well has dampened any hopes I have of this venture being a joyful one. Are there any other pitfalls I need to be made aware of?

http://au.pfinance.yahoo.com/special-features/landlord-troubles/index.html
 
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Reading the below article as well has dampened any hopes I have of this venture being a joyful one. Are there any other pitfalls I need to be made aware of?

http://au.pfinance.yahoo.com/special-features/landlord-troubles/index.html

Challenges from that article
Challenge 1: Finding a Property
Sounds like you have that one licked.

Challenge 2: Preparing the Unit
OK, so depending on the previous tenants you may have a little or a lot to fix up. Sugar soap on the walls and a steam clean of the carpet can make a huge difference.

Challenge 3: Finding Tenants
The internet provides a fast and inexpensive way to find prospective tenants. Of course, you often get what you pay for. Running an ad in a reputable publication often generates a better class of respondents. Instead of college kids looking to save a buck, you increase your odds of getting families and responsible older adults. Running an ad for a month will take a small bite out of your wallet. Properly screening your tenants by running a credit check and background check will take another bite. The investment is well worth the time and money, as proper screening increases your odds of getting responsible tenants. Responsible tenants pay their bills on time, take care of your property and don't require you to engage in the costly and time-consuming eviction process.

This is why I pay a managing agent. They have access to the databases, etc, and advertising is often covered with no additional costs.

Challenge 4: Hassles
Even great tenants and perfect rental properties come with a host of hassles. Broken pipes, stuffed drains, broken garage door springs, pets and roommates are just a few of the challenges that arise. Even good tenants want your full attention when sewage is backing up into their home or the cable company accidentally cuts the telephone lines.

This is why I pay a managing agent. How often does "sewage back up" and "the cable company ... cuts the telephone lines"?

Bad tenants are an even bigger challenge. Daily calls and late or unpaid rent can add up to the hassles. Move-out day is another challenging time. Damage to walls, floors, carpets and other components of the home can lead to disputes and costly repairs. Since every moment wasted arguing is a moment the house sits vacant, you are often better off biting the bullet and paying for the repairs yourself.

Landlord insurance can cover for deliberate damage and loss of rent.

Challenge 5: Maintenance
Maintenance of major components is a big ticket item. New appliances cost hundreds of dollars; a new roof or driveway can cost thousands of dollars. If the rent is $500 per month and the roof is $5,000, you can find yourself losing money fast. Add in carpet, paint and a new stove, and tenants that don't stay long - and the property could lose money for years.

True. Things break. But again, how often do you need to renew a roof or driveway!?!? Fairly extreme examples. Appliances are depreciated and will usually have a life longer than the depreciation. So effectively, you're getting back some of what you paid.

Challenge 6: Interest Rates
What do interest rates have to do with anything? Plenty! When rates fall, it's often cheaper to buy than to rent! Lowering the rent to remain competitive can put a real cramp in your ability to make a buck.

Yep. Fixed interest rates can help you sleep at night. But on the flip site, if interest rates go down, you're paying less interest, so you might make MORE money. Interest rates go up and less people buy a PPOR, rents go up.

This article comes across as written by someone who has maybe had 1 property experience that went really bad, or NO property experience and thinks that shares are the only investment.

If you look for them, you will find the same types of arguments against shares or any other investment vehicle, and counter arguments for this article.

Weigh up the risks, insure against them (insurance, fixed interest rates, property manager) and make up your own mind!

My 2c worth. Apologies for the long post.
 
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If you are concerned about having a tenant sublet, there is a simple solution.
Have a criteria that all your tenants must pass.
Whether it be a certain income, pets, clean criminal check etc.
Whatever happens to be legal in your area.

If the subletters pass, there shouldn't be any problem...right?
 
I think it's the double standard that is bugging DannyHC, and with good reason too. Government departments that look after tenancy issues seem to always lean towards the tenants rights, except in this particular instance, where they say no to subletting themselves but refuse private landlords the right to do the same thing.

An interesting point. Recently when the laws regarding tenancy issues changed up here in Queensland the relevant Government department held a seminar locally to explain all the new rules. We attended the seminar and when they asked for a show of hands, i.e. how many tenants are attending tonight, not a single hand went up, we were all landlords. I got the distinct impression they were disappointed. Their presentation was certainly geared towards tenants at any rate.
 
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