What is a good size for a 1/bd unit?

Hi all,
I'm thinking of buying a 1 bedroom unit to live in. Is there a rule of thumb that some of you use to detirmine if the unit is of a good size?

What's a good size for a living area? Bedrooms? etc.

I know this question is somewhat objective, however i'd really like to hear everyones thoughts.

Thanks!!
 
thevibes...we live in a 1 bedder... It is 69m2 plus our balcony.

We downsized from your typical 3 brm,1 bath, family room family home.

When we looked at how much space was actually OURS and not the kids' :rolleyes: we now have much the same space as before. Our bedroom is the same size as our house bedroom, the bathroom is larger than before, kitchen a bit smaller and the living room is a bit smaller.

I have been is larger and smaller units and some larger ones feel small...so I guess design plays a big part in the "space" feeling.
 
Hi all,
Is there a rule of thumb that some of you use to detirmine if the unit is of a good size?

Be careful with finance. Many lenders have a 50m2 minimum or wont approve finance! But you have to ask outright - they neglect to mention it :(

Our place is approx 50m2 + balcony. It's a pretty good size for a one bedroom really...on the larger size. Rooms about 3.5 - 4m x 4m is decent for bedroom, a little larger for living, and if it's open plan obviously you wnat way more for the kitchen/meals in that allowance.
 
I agree 50m2 is a good size for a 1br.

This allows a fair size kitchen, bathroom, seperate toilet, built in robe and some storage. But if you are going to have much of a dining area it is better to have this as open plan between the kitchen and lounge as otherwise it would look a bit cramped.

A lot of 1br walk-up units built in the 1960s were about 35m2, mainly due to their tiny kitchens and bathrooms. You won't easily fit a washing machine, or space for an ironing board or much storage, and access to the bathroom might be off the bedroom only. At these sorts of sizes a few square metres makes all the difference. Anything much under 35m2 (I've seen 25m2) would have to be a bedsitter/studio only.

Some 2br units around here are probably not much more than 55m2. This is very cramped and less spacious than the abovementioned 50m2 1br unit. Again sacrifices are made in the kitchen and bathroom.

Some old 3br houses would be around 100m2 only. Only half the size of a modern house and cramped by current standards.
 
Some old 3br houses would be around 100m2 only. Only half the size of a modern house and cramped by current standards.
We're in one of those - and my parents say I am mad to want to build a bigger house because people brought up 3 kids in smaller houses back in the day.

Uh, this house IS one of those smaller ones. And I want bigger. And preferably with 2 living areas instead of one and a kitchen. My kitchen here is pushing 30sqm by itself, and we're never in it.
 
"Be careful with finance. Many lenders have a 50m2 minimum or wont approve finance! But you have to ask outright - they neglect to mention it" or have a 70% lend limit.

I don't get why banks are so strict on this size limit i know they say they are harder to sell but i think that's bs i have looked a lot property in Sydney when i was looking for a small city pad and they were snapped up just as fast as bigger properties(1 bedders) do other people think banks will change the 50m2 rule??
 
Definetely at least 50m2, but for actual room to live and have a bit of furniture, i think you need at least 60+ m2. The layout of the area plays a big role too, some living area shapes are more useable than others.
 
Rags - many of the lenders have just updated their policies to make 1br units a min of 50m2 internal space. Previously 40m2 was acceptable for some. They also have other restrictions often if the laundry is shared they don't like that, obviously if it is company title etc etc. The main reason is their resale market is restricted to a singles and couples no kids as purchasers if they have to sell and get rid of the property due to you defaulting.

If you are interested in how lenders look at specific securities here is a brief summary I wrote as an add on feature to a recent API article.

http://www.apimagazine.com.au/api-online/web-specials/2009/09/how-banks-assess-risk

Hope this helps
Jane
 
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