White Knight product - brush strokes

From: Denise Macadam


Greetings

I have been reading with much enthusiasm the experiences of those using the bathroom paint product for tiles.(White knight) Have mentioned to a few people and a friend said yesterday she did her bathroom. Said she was a bit disappointed as you can see the brush strokes. Said they used a very good quality brush - have others had this experience, or how did you avoid it?
What's an honest opinion on the end result, and would you use it again?
The other half wants to get the professionals in - but I love to give something a go, and will hear about it for ever if it doesn't turn out to good!

Any advice for me?
With thanks,
Denise
 
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Reply: 1
From: Steven Parker


Hi Denise!! Hope all is going well with you and your renovations!
Perhaps you saw my post about the WK paints- I have had mixed success (depending on what was used) but my friend had great success using a roller for the tiles- I saw it last week, freshly dried, and I couldn't spot any flaws. Just masking tape the walls well, do the edges first with a small brush and then roller away, using a normal sized one that you'd use on walls. The paint does dry very quickly.
Cheers, Jacque :)
 
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Reply: 1.1
From: Denise Macadam


Thanks Jacque,

AAAHHHHH - the old roller trick, of course!!!! great idea, thanks for the tip.
Best Wishes,
Denise
 
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Reply: 1.1.1
From: Phillip Jacovelli


Denise,

I find that those small foam rollers that you can get from Bunnings work pretty well for this type of fiddly work as well as window trims. Just be careful as they tend to spray as you roll a lot more than the regular rollers, so cover things up well.

good luck

Phil J
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1
From: Vicki .


I've just helped my sister paint her IP bathroom tiles and kitchen tiles/laminate doors and was disappointed with the finish on the tiles. You can see the brush strokes even though we used the 6cm foam roller. By the way, make sure you have filled all the grouting gaps before you paint!
I got the professionals in to do my own bathroom and it looks fantastic but cost $$$.

Vicki

Once begun a task is easy, half the work is done.
Horace
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1
From: Duncan M



Do the professional spray it?

Duncan.

-----Original Message-----
From: propertyforum Listmanager
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Subject: White Knight product - brush strokes


From: "Vicki ." <vicki@focal-point.com.au>

I've just helped my sister paint her IP bathroom tiles and kitchen
tiles/laminate doors and was disappointed with the finish on the tiles. You
can see the brush strokes even though we used the 6cm foam roller. By the
way, make sure you have filled all the grouting gaps before you paint!
I got the professionals in to do my own bathroom and it looks fantastic but
cost $$$.

Vicki

Once begun a task is easy, half the work is done.
Horace



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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1
From: Vicki .


Yes. Day 1 they clean and etch the tiles and day 2 they spray the enamel on. They look brand new.

Vicki

Once begun a task is easy, half the work is done.
Horace
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1.1
From: Duncan M




Seems if you are going to do it yourself it might pay to hire a compressor
and buy yourself a decent spray gun.. They take a little getting used to but
they arent hard to use. The trick would be finding the optimum amount of
thinning agent to add so that it sprays nicely.


Duncan.
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1
From: Michele B


Dunc, spraying would be optimum but I'm told a lambswool applicator is the secret!
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1
From: Steven Parker


Michele,
Do you mean a lambswool roller?
Cheers, Jacque :)
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1
From: .watto .


Hi All,

Be careful with lambs wool applicators, i used several for sealing sheets of MDF for workbench tops, with two pack polyurhetane.

The lambs wool sheds fibres like crazy, even after numerous pre cleans and tumble dries.

Thankfully the benches weren't that critical for finish.

For the 1st couple of coats we used a spray gun and the finish was fantastic, but the overspary was a nightmare it settled on every flat surface in sight, leaving a dull mottled look and feel.

The spray option also consumed a lot of extra polyurethane.


Cheers
Watto
Melb Freestyler
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1
From: Owen .


I recently did a kitchen using WK for the cupboard doors and tile splashback. I ended up brushing the doors and they came up fine. Looks really glossy and pretty smooth as the paint is oil based and the brush strokes settled out because I painted the doors on flat trestles.

However with the tiles I tried one of the small foam rollers others have mentioned and the paint came up in thousands of little bubbles all over. I had to to hit the tiles with sander and coarse paper to get it smooth again and paint them with a brush. Nightmare.

I'm about to do the same to another kitchen but with ESP and gloss paint and this time I am going to spray. Should be done by the end of next week so I'll let everyone know how I go.

Owen

"Gambling promises the poor what property performs for the rich – something for nothing"
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1
From: Rachel Freedman


One thing to consider is how long you want the finish to last and what sort of colour you are going to use.

I have used Tub'n'Tile for floor tiles - used plain white over brown needed 2 good coats but looks good.

Used 2 coats tile paint in white over beige and looks fantastic - applied with a good brush. I do acknowledge that white will generally look better than other colours anyway as brushstrokes do not show up as readily.

Used ESP and gloss paint on kitchen splashback just as a rough trial - deep blue over beige tiles. Looks good from a distance but fairly dull finish and brushstrokes evident close-up - but everyone that comes to the house comments on the great tiles!

I am happy if the finishes we have used hold for 3 yrs. By then total bathroom will need reno (new shower recess, vanity etc) and I will re-tile but for now our bathroom looks modern (I added a funky new combination of small blue tiles for a tile border-cost $70 cheaper than actual border tiles).

I have also heard you can tile over floor tiles - anyone had experience with this?

Rachel
Canberra Freestyler Coordinator
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1
From: Bydntsel .


Hi Rachel

There are a number of adhesives on the market that will allow you to tile over tiles, etc.

The tile outlet should by able to advise you what adhesives are available in you state.

The instructions on the packaging that the adhesive comes in must state that it can be used for tiling over the surface of your job.

Over wall tiles I use sugar soap to clean.

You will need.
Sugar soap
Rubber gloves, Steel wool for extra abrasion & don’t forget the hot water ,
Rinse of with plenty of water.

Floors.
The most affective method is to slightly scour the surface.
You will need either a belt sander or an angel grinder.
This method can be used over Vinyl, Ceramic, Cork & Fiberglass.

SURFACES TO BE RETILED MUST BE SOUND WITH NO LOOSE TILES.

“Things are rarely what they seem to be”
 
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Reply: 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1
From: David Lutan


Hi Team,
Just a thought on how to get brush stokes and air bubles out from painting tiles. I wonder if after painted (and dried etc) we can polish them with something like auto polish? Would this smoothen the finish?

Just an idea

Dave
 
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