Would you buy weather board houses?

Our weatherboard IP was build in 1905 - so it seemed to be pretty robust. Briack walls can crack, but wood is quite flexible.

You can also cut out and replace as required - this can be really handy if some big plumbing problem happens (we had a leaking pipe inside a brick wall which could be accessed from inside - plumber had to sledgehammer his way in, fix the leak, then replace bricks and rerender...not a cheap exercise (thank goodness for insurance!). :eek:

Cheers,

The Y-man
 
Was wondering brick houses are going to last longer or?...

Any reason why you wouldn't?

A lot of the old timber houses were built quite well. They are fairly simple and cheap to repair or beautify.

It doesn't matter your construction type - if a property has good maintenance then it will last a long time.
 
Same here Jo! Weatherboard but I'm told there is some asbestos in the make up of it.

Though I'd say it's the bit of dirt the weatherboard house is sitting on that's going up in value. ;)

FYI s050 - mine will have been standing there for 50yrs next year and still going strong (I think?) despite the dregs that have lived inside it from time to time.
 
No - I have a fetish for old stone houses :p

However I'm planning to build a weatherboard house on my empty block when I find some money somewhere.
 
Same here Jo! Weatherboard but I'm told there is some asbestos in the make up of it.

Though I'd say it's the bit of dirt the weatherboard house is sitting on that's going up in value. ;)

FYI s050 - mine will have been standing there for 50yrs next year and still going strong (I think?) despite the dregs that have lived inside it from time to time.

Ditto.

Definately the piece of dirt that holds the value. I would consider mine to be fairly modern then with only 45 odd years to it's vintage.;) I can still picture that orange carpet in the kitchen....................

Regards JO
 
I love weatherboard houses, as they generally have more character, then the typical brick veneer box you find everywhere.

I've never really understood the reasoning for people who say, "weatherboard houses are higher maintenance."
 
I own weatherboard (asbestos) houses that were build after WW2 and are still going strong. But, to be honest, I'd prefer brick - fewer health issues for the tenants over th long term.
 
Same here Jo! Weatherboard but I'm told there is some asbestos in the make up of it.

Though I'd say it's the bit of dirt the weatherboard house is sitting on that's going up in value. ;)

FYI s050 - mine will have been standing there for 50yrs next year and still going strong (I think?) despite the dregs that have lived inside it from time to time.

the older hardies has paper stickers on the back stating 10% asbestos, in the boards , so be carfull, :cool:
 
as far as the waetherboard home ( remember this) the home is only there to pay for the dirt under it, if it does so, go for it!
 
In Qld "weatherboard" means timber NOT hardiplank (which has asbestos).
Timber houses seem to keep a fairbit of value especially anything that looks like a traditional qlder, but hardiplank reeks of 1970's kitsch. that being said my best performers are ugly hardiplank:)
 
Yes definitely would buy a weatherboard house for the simple reason that it'll look brand new with a fresh coat of paint. The only thing you'll need to lookout for prior to purchasing the place would possibly be getting a house inspection done to ensure there are no termites or any other insects living in the wood.
 
one good thing about timber walls (besides being able to paint them easily), is that if you get earth movement, ie an earthquake, then they will flex to absorb the movement and then settle back into place (to an extent). A brick home will just have cracked walls (don't know how flexible a fibro wall is though).

I learnt the value of timber walls while living in an eathquake region in asia. it's rather "strange" that all the old 100 year old traditonal homes survive 6.5 earthquakes and yet the newer concrete/brick homes end up with cracked walls and more often then not, topple over.

But the strange thing to me is that the people in this area would prefer to buy the newer concrete homes as they have more prestige compared to the older traditional homes. In contrast, I find the traditional chinese courtyard homes to be very appealing but the local population don't want much to do with them.

oh well.


g
 
Was wondering brick houses are going to last longer or?...

majority of my property is timber/weather board. Maintenance is higher than brick but so is purchase price for brick generally. In NQ older most houses are weatherboard and or fibro.

Yes brick is going to last longer but that is no reason not to purchase wood!

Regards
 
I love weatherboard houses, as they generally have more character, then the typical brick veneer box you find everywhere.
Absolutely. In nicer parts of Brisbane, timber QLDers command a premium, as confirmed by joanmc:
Timber houses seem to keep a fairbit of value especially anything that looks like a traditional qlder
Are there any other ways to spot asbestos, especially when it's not clear when the house was built?
You can buy a kit at Bunnings. :)
But the strange thing to me is that the people in this area would prefer to buy the newer concrete homes as they have more prestige compared to the older traditional homes. In contrast, I find the traditional chinese courtyard homes to be very appealing but the local population don't want much to do with them.
Ooooh, a Chinese courtyard home! I'm going to look at real estate sites; sounds divine. Would also love a traditional Moroccan courtyard home (riad).
 
Ooooh, a Chinese courtyard home! I'm going to look at real estate sites; sounds divine. Would also love a traditional Moroccan courtyard home (riad).

i've often thought of trying to build a traditional chinese courtyard home here and to see what the reaction is. I think the design of them are great as they are very private and the security on them is good - and plus, they are good for families.

More importantly, they are good in hot weather too as they provide plenty of ventilation and also shade. Much better compared to many 3-4 bedroom brick "homes" that are being built now.


thanks

g
 
i've often thought of trying to build a traditional chinese courtyard home here and to see what the reaction is. I think the design of them are great as they are very private and the security on them is good - and plus, they are good for families.

More importantly, they are good in hot weather too as they provide plenty of ventilation and also shade. Much better compared to many 3-4 bedroom brick "homes" that are being built now.
Couldn't agree more, and have had the same thought about building a contemporary take on the riad. ;)
 
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