Courtyard Homes - Capital Growth

ie Houses with very limited backyard.

1. Has anyone noticed Capital Growth in these Investment Properties ?.
2. Outer Suburb vs Inner Suburbs is there much difference ( in capital growth ) or has the first home owners pushed up the stats in these categories.

I have a feeling that they ( Courtyard Homes ) are good for rent returns and depreciation and not so good on Capital Growth. I have seen median growth stats for Mawson Lakes SA in the region of 4.4% which makes does not make me confident of long term Capital Growth. I am aware that suburb has a lot of construction and apartment style living that is keeping the median growth low.

Does anyone have an Investment Property that is a courtyard and have you experienced capital growth and how far from CBD is it.

Appreciate Opinions and if this has been already discussed. appreciate the link

Regards

AK
 
Arthur,

It would venture to say that is not the type of home - courtyard or otherwise that is a determiner of capital growth. It is sales demand, rental demand, supply and demand etc. All property in a suburb tends to move in line with the suburb's CG.

Mawson Lakes in SA is a long way north of the CBD.
 
I have seen median growth stats for Mawson Lakes SA in the region of 4.4% which makes does not make me confident of long term Capital Growth. I am aware that suburb has a lot of construction and apartment style living that is keeping the median growth low.

The CG stats for Mawson Lakes are a function of the suburb, not courtyard homes, per se.
CG is all about desireability and scarcity. Anywhere you get those two elements combined, there will be CG in that area, whether the vehicle be courtyard homes, apartments or houses on large blocks of land.
 
I brought a Townhouse in Mosman Park, Perth. About 11ks from the CBD but only about 500m to the beach, 200m to the train etc.

Brought Feb 09 for $340,000
Townhouse next to mine in original condition just had an offer accepted for $447,000.

I would say mine would sell for at least the same
 
Courtyard homes are just part of a continuum that extends from student studios in large complexes, small apartments in large complexes, apartments in small complexes, villa units with courtyards, townhouses, duplexes, stand-alone units to houses.

In a low amenity (cheaper) suburb if they're not much cheaper than a house on a full block, I can't see the attraction (except for lower maintenance).

But in a high amenity (dearer) suburb where heaps of people want a house but most must compromise with something smaller there's nothing wrong with them.

As evidenced by the popularity of units, terraces and townhouses in such areas, people don't mind a small yard provided it's got adequate security, enough room for a shed, deck and bit of lawn along with good privacy. A garage would be a big advantage.

Units (in a couple of regional cities) that I've had have had excellent growth, good tenants and not too many maintenance hassles. Prices, growth and rents would have been similar to houses, although these houses would have been in the cheaper areas of town that locals shun (whereas my units have been very close to either town or beach).

Quite modest 30-40 year old 2br villa units around here have recently sold for $330 - 370k. When not long ago they were in the mid 200s. On a percentage basis I don't think there's much to choose between them and houses though the latter are obviously better from a development viewpoint.

But overall there's nothing wrong with courtyard homes as they will appeal to a lot of household types.
 
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