Asbestos

If a house is built in 1982/1983, is it likely to have asbestos?

When was its use popular?
What sort of domestic dwelling is likely to have it?

I know the best way to find out is to get it checked through building inspection.

But what are your thoughts?
 
In todays West it states that by July 1st you must have a certified asbestos removal card if removing more than 10 sqm and that includes the home handy man too
 
I believe that prior to 1970 it was used for a multitude of purposes in domestic dwellings. Not as late as the 1980s, though. I think you're fine.
 
James Hardie told me that it was included in product made up to and including 1984. It is usually used in the bathroom sheeting and of course hardiplanks.
 
Asbestos was banned in manufacturing from the early 1980's, however, it sat in the storage yards of many builders / tradesmen for goodness knows how many years afterwards, and in some instances may have been used in homes.

It is true that the only way to tell is by testing, but there are means of making a 'visual identification' for some distinct asbestos products i.e. cement sheeting.

Asbestos was commonly used in bathrooms, under tiles, as a replacement for wall tiles 'tilux' was a commonly used decorated laminate sheet, in kitchens, behind tiles, IN the vinly floor tiles and sometimes in the adhesive used for vinyl floor tiles. Walls in wet areas such as laundries and toilets commonly had asbestos....it could be anywhere really.

Do you have a particular material in the house that looks suspect?
 
Many houses have it in the eaves. Often in the second and third bedroom, even if the main bedroom is plaster. And the other places already mentioned, of course.
 
I phoned building inspectors and they said they can't do roofing inspections.

I don't have a particular suspect area... heck I don't even know what cement sheeting looks like!

It's just that we are going to partition the house on the second storey and I don't know if it will be safe... I suppose the carpenter (qualified) will definitely know eh?

Thanks for all the info so far.

Further info appreciated.

(PS, can I just add that I wish that Victorian law requires compulsory building inspection reports before any one can sell!)
 
The only way to be sure, if it is, or, is not, is by testing in a lab. The last one I had done cost $150.00 ( a couple of years ago). As a Chippie I work on the age of the place and even if its in the early 80's I will get it checked, depending on whats got to be done.

Be safe get it tested then you will know :).

Brian
 
One of my ip,s was built pre 1950. So that would make the sheeting radioactive esbestos with a nice coating of lead based paint :(
 
I spoke to James Hardie about this a few years ago and they said that in the case of cement sheeting (commonly called 'fibro' ), if you can get to the back of the sheet and you can see a serial number there, they can tell you if it has asbestos in it.

If there is no serial/batch number then it probably DOES contain asbestos as it was used in everything.

Obviously the only way to get to the back of the sheet in most cases is to break it which will produce dust fibres so don't do that.

You can usually pick 'fibro' as the nails used to hold it in place are flat-heads and those are seen on the surface of the wall. They are not sunk into the sheeting material and then filled as normal gyprok screws are.

I sent 3 samples of this type of material off for testing (not expensive) and all 3 came back positive for asbestos. In older houses the fibro is often used in later additions to the house (eg laundries, kitchens, etc)

Out of interest I was in Perth recently and noticed a LOT of corrugated fibro fences between houses. These are quite old and most of them are crumbling or broken. I am sure they all contain asbestos! I can't believe people are willing to live with these very dangerous fences around their houses. One of the doctors who treats mesothelioma ( the agressive form of lung cancer that is caused by asbestos fibre inhalation ) said recently that the formula for getting this fatal disease is " 1 fibre plus 40 years"

Scary stuff!
 
I didn't think age had much to do with it as long as it's sound. Their is not much mystery left in asbestos. It is the airbourne fibres that do the damage. If it is not disturbed and has a good protection coating like paint then it is fine. Your Teflon frying pans are probably a higher risk. Actually just re-read your post. You mean you get the desease 40 years after exposer to the fibres. You are correct there sadly.
I spoke to James Hardie about this a few years ago and they said that in the case of cement sheeting (commonly called 'fibro' ), if you can get to the back of the sheet and you can see a serial number there, they can tell you if it has asbestos in it.

If there is no serial/batch number then it probably DOES contain asbestos as it was used in everything.

Obviously the only way to get to the back of the sheet in most cases is to break it which will produce dust fibres so don't do that.

You can usually pick 'fibro' as the nails used to hold it in place are flat-heads and those are seen on the surface of the wall. They are not sunk into the sheeting material and then filled as normal gyprok screws are.

I sent 3 samples of this type of material off for testing (not expensive) and all 3 came back positive for asbestos. In older houses the fibro is often used in later additions to the house (eg laundries, kitchens, etc)

Out of interest I was in Perth recently and noticed a LOT of corrugated fibro fences between houses. These are quite old and most of them are crumbling or broken. I am sure they all contain asbestos! I can't believe people are willing to live with these very dangerous fences around their houses. One of the doctors who treats mesothelioma ( the agressive form of lung cancer that is caused by asbestos fibre inhalation ) said recently that the formula for getting this fatal disease is " 1 fibre plus 40 years"

Scary stuff!
 
One simple way of testing if sheeting has asbestos fibres in it is by holding a cigarette lighter to it. If the fibres burn then they are cellulose (used after asbestos got banned), if they don't burn and remain like glass fibres, then you have asbestos.

In terms of removal, for my place I have paid $60 per 500kg. (Its a flat rate up to 500kg). You just have to double wrap it in builders plastic.

When i removed mine i sprayed it with watered down PVA glue, once it dries it binds the fibres.
 
Top