REPEATED: What advice would you give yourself 10 years ago that you know now?

Don't 'gamble' with penny stocks.
Plenty of $ wasted on the market which could have been invested in assets that actually appreciate (property!)
 
Repeated

Start with the end in mind, set a goal for what you want to have at a certain point in time in the future.

Then work back from that to what it is that you need to do TODAY to get you 1 step closer to that goal.

It seems to make everything simpler then, and also makes what others perceive as difficult or hard just another logical step you yourself are taking to get toward your end goal.

Be open to personal growth opportunities and learning that while you may make mistakes, that sometimes it is the best way to learn and grow.

Have the courage and tenacity to make a decision and stick to it, taking control over your own destiny to make things happen.

Don't be too arrogant to admit that you don't know everything, just because you may have achieved some success in a certain area (financially) that you can't learn more than you already have.

Remember that you don't know what you don't know, and also that sometimes you don't even know that you don't know what you don't know....so be open to others ideas that may open your eyes to an "a hah" moment.

Find a balance to your "planning for the future vs living for the moment" I have found this the biggest challenge in my own life!

Have fun every day, life is short, moments are precious, so go out and give it a good shake!!
 
Find your interests, follow your passion, and do some personal development!
However, I doubt I would have understood what that meant 10 or 20 years ago???
 
I'm 26 now, if I could turn back time I would tell my 16yo self to:
- Start investing earlier.
- Learn everything there is to know about selling, negotiating and closing.
- Would definitely have NOT gone to uni.
- Get my mind on my money and my money on my mind.

Cheers,

Taku
 
- don't be afraid to convert to cash, as opposed to never ever ever sell. you really only want to hold thru the upswing, not the sideway shuffle or even worse the downturn
- if you start a devy, ensure you have the fire power to finish it even in changed circumstances
- appreciate the value of every dollar
- keep leverage down, you don't need to own the world so go slowly and surely
- recognise a boom when you are in it and get the hell out before everyone else does. And don't worry if you leave the party slightly early, if you've had a great night and are happy with the girl you have found just get out of there before it gets messy
 
Buy where owner occupiers live

Dont buy new - too high a premium and for houses too far out

Stay away from property advisors getting kick backs from "the team" when you are referred onto them

Do your research
 
Follow Nathan Birch's methods more closely and take action doing what he did. (Nathan had 40 houses when I met him around 2007 -2008 and now he has 160 +).
 
like Prop said - Buy more property in high growth inner CBD suburbs. My first buy was too far from cbd. If I picked something closer to cbd, the better equity growth over the years would've assisted me in accumulating at a much faster rate
Same thing happened to me
 
- don't be afraid to convert to cash, as opposed to never ever ever sell. you really only want to hold thru the upswing, not the sideway shuffle or even worse the downturn
- if you start a devy, ensure you have the fire power to finish it even in changed circumstances
- appreciate the value of every dollar
- keep leverage down, you don't need to own the world so go slowly and surely
- recognise a boom when you are in it and get the hell out before everyone else does. And don't worry if you leave the party slightly early, if you've had a great night and are happy with the girl you have found just get out of there before it gets messy
This is a good post, kudos
 
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