Termite windows

Does anyone know if these termite windows are worth it.

They are small things drilled into the wood of your home, and you can see if there is any termites in your wood.

www.greenpest.com.au

For $100.00 it would be a very good investment
 
Termites

Hey can someone please give me some comment on the Termite Windows.

If it works, it would be one of the best things out, wouldn't it??
 
If they dont eat that particular peice of wood, you wont know, that's one problem

i've seen whole skirting board eaten out in one room, but windows were not touched.

In which pieces of wood would you put them ?
 
Termites hate light, so it is hard to see how they would go anywhere near a light source such as a little window.

They even build mud tunnels when they go above ground, which makes them easy to spot on stumps in high set houses.
Marg
 
Apparently they can be placed into window sills, door fames, skirting boards, and it must magnify much bigger so you could see if there is any termite in these areas.
 
I can't quite see how this would work...termites don't like light so why would they go where there is light? It doesn't make sense to me.

The first we knew we had termites was when I washed the floor and the mop went straight through the window sill, all that was left was the paint.

I think a better way would be to get the place treated so it was termite proof.

Chris
 
IF they've got a website with some photos or someting, post a link

otherwise, I don't thin they will be very accurate at all.

Termites can start on a peice of wood, they enter it from one spot and decide where to eat, they might not even get to the bit where the window is, they might climb up the next adjoining timber. With so many peices of timber, where would you decide to put them, or how many would you need ?
 
If you put one about every two inches in every bit of wood in your entire house, you'd be right :D

I've spotted the buggers from the thing-goes-through-wood (in my case it was the flailing limbs of a small child, not a mop), the dirt-and-spit they use to plug up any irritating nailholes or so forth that let light in, and doors getting 'sticky' because the tunnels behind the wood are pushing out and making the doorframe smaller. The professionals have a gizmo that 'listens' for munching noises.

Screw the tenants trashing the house, when I do my inspections I'm more interested in checking for termites. I have a barrier treatment but they still get under it, and it is cheaper to kill em when you see em than treat the entire house and STILL need to kill em when you see em.
 
If you put one about every two inches in every bit of wood in your entire house, you'd be right :D

I've spotted the buggers from the thing-goes-through-wood (in my case it was the flailing limbs of a small child, not a mop), the dirt-and-spit they use to plug up any irritating nailholes or so forth that let light in, and doors getting 'sticky' because the tunnels behind the wood are pushing out and making the doorframe smaller. The professionals have a gizmo that 'listens' for munching noises.

Screw the tenants trashing the house, when I do my inspections I'm more interested in checking for termites. I have a barrier treatment but they still get under it, and it is cheaper to kill em when you see em than treat the entire house and STILL need to kill em when you see em.

The only problem with killing em where you see them, is we owners/tnenats etc can only kill the few that we see. That's a teeny weeny tiny percentage of the entier nest of termites that will just continue eating.

Must beharder in a rural area such as yours where it woumight not be as straightforwrd as metro areas - if they get under the berrier, the termte compnay has to set it right, some have timber repalcement guarantees also if they happen to eat any fixed timber (yes, others have questiond how reliable these warranties are too...)
 
They stick some dust stuff in the holes that apparently they carry back to the nest, drill a few holes around the damaged area and pump in liquid poison. They aren't just killing half a dozen visible termites.

Last time I had termites in it was about a week after the last warranty expired, so there went another $200 for a spot treatment. The only wood in this house is doorframes, window frames and 2 rooms that still have skirtings - they've never got as far as the roof, which is about 4.5m off the ground and the walls are dry as a dead dingo's donger (have to say that, the house in question is borderline outback :D ).

I had my worst termite damage adjacent to a badly leaking iron rainwater tank, and in a cupboard - with some delicious books in it - that got soaked in the 2007 floods, and before I had the house reroofed everywhere there was a leaking gutter there were eaten out skirtings, which is why I ended up removing most of the skirtings. They like moisture, and don't seem to do much damage each visit.

The house is 134 years old ... in an area that is so deforested it is no surprise the termites go for houses. I'm not all that fussed, its still a house and it only cost me $25k.
 
They stick some dust stuff in the holes that apparently they carry back to the nest, drill a few holes around the damaged area and pump in liquid poison. They aren't just killing half a dozen visible termites.

Last time I had termites in it was about a week after the last warranty expired, so there went another $200 for a spot treatment. The only wood in this house is doorframes, window frames and 2 rooms that still have skirtings - they've never got as far as the roof, which is about 4.5m off the ground and the walls are dry as a dead dingo's donger (have to say that, the house in question is borderline outback :D ).

I had my worst termite damage adjacent to a badly leaking iron rainwater tank, and in a cupboard - with some delicious books in it - that got soaked in the 2007 floods, and before I had the house reroofed everywhere there was a leaking gutter there were eaten out skirtings, which is why I ended up removing most of the skirtings. They like moisture, and don't seem to do much damage each visit.

The house is 134 years old ... in an area that is so deforested it is no surprise the termites go for houses. I'm not all that fussed, its still a house and it only cost me $25k.

Correct, he's trying to kill the nest, not kill the ones he found where he found them, that was all I meant. Many people do think killing the ones eating a piece of timber solves the problem. You cant normally do twhat the termite techie did yourself unelss you have access to arsenic .. then the people who answer the terrorist hotline may want to speak with you
 
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