Tiling problem

From: Geoff Whitfield


Hi,

Last week I had an internal floor tiling job done on a new IP. The job was great- but one hour after the tilers finished, there was a big storm. I found the floor half sodden in water. Now that it's dry, the submerged bit has white grouting, the other dark grey.

Would this have softened the grouting?

Is there a way to fix this without the expensive way of getting the grout removed and having it regrouted?

Thanks
 
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Reply: 1
From: Simon and Julie M


Hi Geoff
Good old Mother Nature. Sometimes all you can do is start again. I would imagine the problem is repairable. How about ringing the Tiler and explaining the problem. He might just come and fix it for you.
Kind regards
Simon
 
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Reply: 1.1
From: Geoff Whitfield


Tiler has quoted $450 to fix the problem (by regrouting).

Is there a cheaper way?
 
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Reply: 1.1.1
From: Manny B


Hi there,

I think if you would like the job to be done properly, you should re-grout it... $450 does seem a little steap for a re-grouting job, you may want to shop around...

As you mentioned it was caused due to the storm, would it be covered by your insurance (you may want to call them & ask)

Cheers,

Manny.
 
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Reply: 1.1.2
From: Rachel Freedman


I actually regrouted my own wall tiles in the bathroom - turned out very well and a very easy job although time consuming. I am not sure whether the same principles apply to the floor? Probably not ? Our floor tiles look like they are tiled straight into cement!

Hardware shops sell a special grout remover tool and grout - I would do it ASAP before it hardens if you are going to try DIY.

Rachel F
 
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Reply: 1.1.2.1
From: Michael Duffy




Hi Geoff

Sounds like the surface water has brought
lime content in the sand/cement grout to the top.This may be removed using hydrocloric acid in the correct ratio which is on the container.Just pour on stained area and brush in using a stiff brush/broom then clean off with cold water.

PS.....cover up all bare skin and wear goggles and rubber gloves.
 
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Reply: 1.1.2.1.1
From: Bydntsel .


Hi Geoff


Interesting stuff grout. Usually a sand and cement based product. Different brands vary greatly in hardness.

I would recommend scraping the grout surface in both areas (discolored and normal) to determine whether one is harder than the other , that should indicate any weakness coursed by excessive wetting.

The excess water would more than likely strengthen rather than weaken the grout.

A light acid wash may remove the film from the discolored area ( 25 to one. hydrochloric acid ).
As Michael has suggested make sure no acid gets on to anything els and use plenty of water to wash of.

Removal of existing grout may be undertaken using a grout rake and Lots of elbow grease .
Gout rakes can be purchased from most tile shops , it is a scraping tool with caberundem chips.
Use with great care, one slip and you have a permanent scratch on your tiles , damage to the tile edges is also likely even when taking great care.

Therefore in your case commended as a last resort.

For any one considering regrouting walls or floors it may be worthwhile using a grout rack to remove only the top discolored layer. This dose not pose the same risk to causing damage to tiles as you are not trying to remove grout to any depth . (for regrouting a depth of 3 to 4 mil is needed otherwise the new grout will be pulled out when washing of )

byndtsel

“Things are rarely what they seem to be”
 
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Reply: 1.1.2.1.1.1
From: Geoff Whitfield


Thank you people.

My initial investigation suggested that the whiteness goes down- at least 3mm. So it's probably not just a salt deposit on the top. But I will investigate for hardness- thanks for the tip.

I will try a small sample of acid too.

I suspect that the water may have leached out the colour from the grey grouting. But I've no way of knowing.

On the subject of kitchen tiles (and the difference in grout colouring between tiles around the stove and those elsewhere), I have had someone suggest to me that I have two choices. Either scrub the dirty ones like anything for several hours- or put linseed oil into the whiter tiles to make the grouting match.

Is this an option?
 
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