Leaking balcony

Hello,

I suspect this has been asked before but I was hoping for some advice about a balcony leak in my rental property.

I've been advised by the Stata that the unit below mine has water penetrating into their kitchen roof, which is below my balcony.

The strata engaged plumbers to investigate and they advised that the issue lies with the works pertaining to the enclosed balcony of my unit. However as the enclosed balcony was not approved by the Owners Corp it's incumbent on me to address the water penetration issue to the unit below, and pay the initial plumbing inspection cost of approx $250.

I have owned this property for 4 years and the enclosed balcony they refer too was done before I took ownership. To my knowledge (other than tiling, painting etc) the change to the balcony was only bars enclosing the balcony for security purposes. Unfortunately I was unware this was not approved.

As I see it the non approved enclosed balcony and leak are not related and suspect the Strata is using the 'non approved enclosed balcony' as a way to shun their responsibility. I have not had my own plumber investigate (I live overseas and I've just been advised of the problem) but I fail to see how bars on a balcony are responsible for a leak large enough to penetrate the downstairs roof.

I would appreciate any advise you guys may be able to provide.

Thanks a lot.
 
bars, dynabolted to the concrete floor of the balcony, which pierce the concrete roof over the kitchen could do it
 
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Thanks for the reply.

The bars extend from the top of the balcony wall (at hip height) to the roof so I don't think this is the case.
 
does water pond against the balcony floor/ wall junction? inadequate fall may be an issue. wp membrane may have failed also. gutter may be an issue forcing water into eave and down cavity.. could be one or a few issues need photos more info
 
As a buyer, it is up to us to ensure what we are buying.

If the structure was not approved, then it would have been missing on the strata plan. If it is not detailed on any strata report, then it is not allowed.

As such, regardless of who installed it, you now own it and if it is causing damage to common or private property, you are responsible for its prompt repair.

Like marg4000 posted, attain a copy of the strata's contractors investigations and engage your own contractor to review as soon as possible. If it turns out that it is not your responsibility, your contractor will be able to provide a report to forward to strata.

Do not make any payment to strata until your contractor has sighted and commented on what is happening but keep the strata informed of what you are doing.
 
It sounds like it could be a break in the waterproofing membrane under the balcony tiles or at the angle below your windows/doors.

Buildings move, particularly from thermal stress on balconies relative to cooler non-exposed areas, so unless the waterproofing there had suitable breaker-bonds installed with the waterproofing at the wall-floor junctions, cracking in the waterproofing membrane can readily occur. Balconies are absolutely notorious for this.

The problem is exacerbated by inward-tilting concrete balcony slabs (they should always have an outward fall), because water always gets under tiles eventually. Check in particular that the water is not entering the concrete slab directly under your door/window jamb, because this is often the culprit with inward-tilting balconies (and the waterproofed angle - which should be durable marine-grade 316 stainless steel for exteriors - that should be there hasn't corroded.)

The only sure solution for this whole dilemma is to remove everything on the floor (tiles, screed, old waterproofing, including at least 100mm up all walls) and re-waterproof, re-screed and re-tile. It's good practice to re-waterproof over the screed, adding a second layer of protection, as this will also inhibit dreaded 'efflorescence', which is the all-to-common flushing of cement salts and ash up between tiles that happens when water penetrates through cracking grout joints, leaving a crusty white residue.

There's a company called "Megasealed" in Sydney that re-treat without removing the tiles, but I don't know if they have an outdoors-area solution (they mainly do bathrooms from what I understand). Might not work, so it could be good dollars following bad down the drain. (I never trust quick-fixes myself.)

Agree that you get a consultant in. You might start with the Master Builders or Master Plumbers Associations to get an expert referral, rather than some local yokel who may or may not be a suitable 'consultant' in this fraught area, as it could get very expensive very quickly.

Feel free to PM me if you need the number of a good tiler with waterproofing qualifications in Sydney, but you'll definitely need an expert's advice first.
 
I am having the same prob only it is my down stairs copping the water
had my plumber look at it and he said there was no water proofing membrain there at all so I am taking it up with the builder to cover the cost of fixing the water damage. And the axcess hole he cut into the celing to have a good look at there all this water came frim.
Good luck with your prob
 
Just on a side note, I have worked with "megasealed" here in victoria doing internal works but I believe they do also do external works. I have found the people that I have worked with here to be excellent at what they do but they know it and charge a lot for their services. I wouldn't head down this track first for this situation because it would be a very expensive treatment which may not work.
 
Thanks everyone for your comments, I really appreciate it.

I'm having someone take a look and report on it this week. I'll post an update as soon as the situation becomes clearer. Either way it needs to be fixed.
 
Thought I would give you guys an update.

I managed to get in contact with the strata plumber on Friday and it quickly became clear that my unit was not involved at all. The report the plumber provided the strata did not mention my unit at all, but the strata made the assumption that my unit (above) was at fault. My unit is not considered enclosed, it was the unit below which has been fully enclosed which as caused the leak.

Thanks everyone for your comments.
 
Thought I would give you guys an update.

I managed to get in contact with the strata plumber on Friday and it quickly became clear that my unit was not involved at all. The report the plumber provided the strata did not mention my unit at all, but the strata made the assumption that my unit (above) was at fault. My unit is not considered enclosed, it was the unit below which has been fully enclosed which as caused the leak.

Thanks everyone for your comments.

You dodged a bad-assed bullet there. Well done!
 
mate you are not wrong there ! :eek:

A few lessons learnt;

Even though my units balcony is not considered a 'non approved' enclosure the reality is I purchased it without making myself fully informed. Therefore make sure you know what you are buying, once it's yours it's your responsibility. This could have easily turned ugly.

Don't take anything at face value; follow up and verify statements yourself.
 
Hi everyone,

Megasealed here!

Have just found this thread but wanted to confirm that Megasealed definitely do external areas including outdoor balconies as well as bathrooms. They completely seal over the top of the tiles so no water can penetrate. Visit the website for more information. I am in the process of finalising a balcony illustration that will show you exactly how the water on the balcony is behaving before and after a Megasealed service - this should help you get a firm understanding of how it works. Watch this space!
 
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