wow. uh...yeah, wow.

so like, yeah i, uh...

sorry. some of you may or may not know, i had a very large life changing event called a "car accident" back in Apr 2006 whereby my vehicle, controlled by myself, acted upon my decision to drive through an intersection after it's driver failed to notice the very large 3 day old Harley travelling very fast in my direction. the resultant crash was a "t bone", the car was bent like a banana and the rider managed to miss the front wheel, allowing some crumple and possibly saving his life, and ended up on the road about 10m away with a broken jaw, dislocated shoulder and i think broken leg.

-------------------

anyway, i had a - uh - "series of events" last night and today.

on the way home from WAIP, i turned left instead of right and ended up at Berwick St. oh well, no biggie i thought, i know my way out of here from when i was working in South Perth and East Vic Park.

So driving along Berwick St i come down the hill to site of the accident.

and i gots a thinking just how far and how much has changed for me in four years. how lucky i've been, how hard i've worked, i have two more children, a successful small business and i'm off to bali in about 4 weeks. this was all pondered at about 11:00pm.

this morning there was a bang on the door at about 7:30am. prob my lovely neighbour's kids, asking if they can grab the ball that flew over the fence when they were in the pool last night....

it's a bailiff.

serving me a writ.

for the accident in 2006.

now, he's not suing ME per se, it's just third party insurance cover. the insurance wasn't driving the car so they can't be handed the writ, i have to forward the letter to the insurance commission.

and i got thinking again.

how much sh*t has the dude on the bike been through in the past four years? how can this case still be ongoing? i bet his life has practically been on hold.

and now i sit here - semi depressed at the thought that he gave his four years to me, literally, because i feel i have been living enough for two people.

no i don't need meds, just very very very humbled.
 
Perspective

Great post.......circumstances and the stuff that happens can often be humbling when we have a change of perspective.

There is some truth in the saying......"seek first to understand, then be understood."

Gratitude for "our lot" can serve us well to keep perspective and focus on the important stuff, and not majoring on the minors ;)

Thanks for sharing BC

Unable to attribute kudos for your candid and meaningful post....so acknowledged online :)

**Note to self to spread more around**
 
You're living your life to the best of your ability BC, and more importantly - you're happy with it. Unfortunately there will always be people out there having a hard time, whether of their own making, circumstances, unfortunate events. Be a good person and give back in whatever way you see fit, but try not to let it get you down even though it can be hard at times.
 
how much sh*t has the dude on the bike been through in the past four years? how can this case still be ongoing? i bet his life has practically been on hold.
BELEIVE ME...these instances do put people through sh*t and for a LOT LONGER than 4 years and yes, at times it does feel like your life is on hold. Very frustrating.

Credit to you BC for recognising this.

Regards
Marty
 
coversely, he may be fine whilst some ambulance chaser lawyer who is covering the litigation costs is pursuing the govt for a nice pay out. It all depends on the guys injuries, tho being on a bike you would have to wonder
 
Your insurance company may not be so keen on you posting details in a public forum........:eek:
There is always the possibility that the opposing party will get nasty during the negotiations, so its probably best not to be too open in this context.
Pen
 
Mate, the 'mountain' I live on the side of sees around 25% of the single vehicle motorbike accidents in Qld.

Adrenalin and testosterone fueled behaviour can't be conditioned out of some......and they will always be a life threatening danger to young kids, old people, all people.

Have compassion by all means, but not sympathy.

Life is a school first and last. we are here to learn, to make progress. Some need less subtle lessons than others......and it is better they have that lesson sooner rather than after they have damaged others.
 
Have compassion by all means, but not sympathy.

Life is a school first and last. we are here to learn, to make progress. Some need less subtle lessons than others......and it is better they have that lesson sooner rather than after they have damaged others.

WW - I might be reading your post wrong but you appear to be arguing that no-one should ride motorbikes?

BC has acknowledged that there was no fault on the part of the motorbike rider in this so I'm not sure what "lesson" you think the motorbike rider involved should learn?

To me the lesson here is to be always vigilant for the presence of cyclists and motorbikes on the roads for a vehicle is a lethal weapon and we have to live with the knowledge of what the consequences of our actions can be to others. As a motorcyclist (temporarily without a steed) the other lesson for me is to always be prepared for someone who looks straight at you but still pulls out in front of you.

BC - thanks for your frankness and honesty. It is a useful reminder to all of us who share the road that our mistakes don't just effect us...
 
gee Mate , its a hard call, i like how you are showing care for somone else , selfish people don't do that very often, you know it was exactly that "an acident" its a thing that happens when two things happen at the same time, so don't take it personal, it was just the wrong place at the wrong time. and it was your turn. ;)
 
WW - I might be reading your post wrong but you appear to be arguing that no-one should ride motorbikes?

that's a convenient but wrong inference HE. Motorbike riding on public roads is a high risk activity, even when done cautiously. I've seen enough MBA patients in ICU, orthopaedic wards, and nursing homes to know. Maybe more bikers need to visit nursing homes and see ex Angels riding a wheelchair with their mouth, unable to control the flow of saliva that drips down over the steering lever, or the guy who tears a few cranial nerves when his helmet gets ripped off, and needs to breathe through a permanent tracheostomy.....great fun with a productive chest infection.


BC has acknowledged that there was no fault on the part of the motorbike rider in this so I'm not sure what "lesson" you think the motorbike rider involved should learn?

Maybe you are right. 'very fast' doesn't necessarily mean illegally very fast.
 

Maybe you are right. 'very fast' doesn't necessarily mean illegally very fast.

No worries - I just wasn't sure what you were saying from that post - it's all good! :)

For the record, I agree motorcycling is high risk, far too many motorcyclists take far too many risks not riding to conditions on our roads and the consequences of getting it wrong aren't at all pretty. And that probably most motorcyclists should spend more time in nursing homes...

I also believe it is possible to operate a motorbike in a safe manner with the right mindset. I normally don't go for this "mindset" stuff but with motorcycling it is very important and an acknowledged part of rider training programs - eg never go riding just after you've had an argument with the missus, are angry, distracted, emotional etc.

So I always try to anticipate the car that might pull out in front of me and plan ahead my course of action. But then I tend to ride bikes that can stop and change line much quicker than a Harley because of that.

Either way, I feel much more vulnerable on my bicycle! I have fewer options in my control for self preservation there - someone behind me can just mow me down anytime they didn't see me and the consequences are also not worth thinking about.

Anyway I am getting OT but if this thread only serves to raise awareness of us more vulnerable road users out there then I'm all for it - thanks again BC.
 
About 24 years ago, hubby ran into the back bumper of a car at a roundabout, in first gear. She started to enter the roundabout and changed her mind. Hubby took his eyes off her and didn't see her stop. She was not "obviously" hurt so numbers were exchanged etc.

Next day, she apparently had whiplash :rolleyes:.

Much later (months?) we get a knock on the door and papers served. She was claiming "loss of income" or something like that to the tune of about $30K or a little more. At the time of the incident, hubby had been sent two letters by different areas of his insurer.... one saying "sorry, not covered as your vehicle is over 30 years old" and the other saying "yes, we will insure your 30 year old car". We were worried sick the insurer would not cover him.

We were about to be married, and spent a few very nervous nights. Someone we knew who worked at the company told us that more than likely it was a "try on" and it would probably be settled out of court, and that in his opinion she may get a thousand or two, and told us not to worry.

Maybe your chap has had a really rough time, but maybe it has taken his insurer a while to get things rolling. I hope he is okay, but you may never hear the outcome.

Best wishes to both of you.
 
failed to notice the very large 3 day old Harley...rider managed to miss the front wheel, allowing some crumple and possibly saving his life, and ended up on the road about 10m away with a broken jaw, dislocated shoulder and i think broken leg.


As someone who rides a Harley through that intersection regularly....that story makes me a tad uneasy Blue Card.

-------------------


and now i sit here - semi depressed at the thought that he gave his four years to me....very very very humbled.


My suggestion Bluey - forget the lawyer BS, forget the bailiff BS, forget the insurance co. BS.

Pick up the paperwork, have a squizz what the guy's name and contact details are, and give him a call and enquiry as to how he is going. Maybe even take a six pack around there if you are invited and have a chat mano to mano. Who knows, it may make you both feel better.


Before I got my bike licence over 20 years ago, the ol' man took me through the wards of Shenton Park and showed me what would happen if I mucked around. Bl00dy depressing, I agree WW. I still ride the bike every day, and grabbing a tree trunk or two, everything is still intact.
 

that's a convenient but wrong inference HE. Motorbike riding on public roads is a high risk activity, even when done cautiously. I've seen enough MBA patients in ICU, orthopaedic wards, and nursing homes to know.

Yup, apparently referred to by medical staff in hospitals (in SA anyway) as "TA's". :eek:
 
As someone who rides a Harley through that intersection regularly....that story makes me a tad uneasy Blue Card.

-------------------
My suggestion Bluey - forget the lawyer BS, forget the bailiff BS, forget the insurance co. BS.

Pick up the paperwork, have a squizz what the guy's name and contact details are, and give him a call and enquiry as to how he is going. Maybe even take a six pack around there if you are invited and have a chat mano to mano. Who knows, it may make you both feel better.


Before I got my bike licence over 20 years ago, the ol' man took me through the wards of Shenton Park and showed me what would happen if I mucked around. Bl00dy depressing, I agree WW. I still ride the bike every day, and grabbing a tree trunk or two, everything is still intact.

my dad rides a bike religiously - it's his preferred mode of transport - and i was borrowing HIS car at the time of the prang as well....! i was a nominated driver so covered and all is legit from the paperwork side of things.

i knew his name from the ambos. i called the hospital to see if he was okay, apprently he was resting and they said they'd let him know i called. dunno if they did or not, but that's out of my control.

maybe i will send him a small letter or call. i highly doubt any favourable response, but hey - at least it'll put some water under the bridge.
 
maybe i will send him a small letter or call. i highly doubt any favourable response, but hey - at least it'll put some water under the bridge.

As I mentioned previously, you do need to be careful about your insurance when you contact the other driver, or admit guilt in the accident.
Some insurance companies specifically say that you should not admit guilt, and having done so on a public forum, you may find that your insurance company have concerns, or in the most extreme situation may refuse to cover your payout.
I understand the concern that you have for this guys welfare, and that is great. But there is now a legal case, and you ensure that you are protecting yourself legally and financially. His lawyers will be keen to maximise the payout that he is able to achieve, and may use all sorts of methods to do this.
Pen
 
an insurance investigation has already been made into the crash and i was found at fault.

the police report filed indicated i was at fault, apprently i wasn't charged because of extra circumstances i won't go into here.

my insurance company already found me at fault and charged the excess applicable.
 
HE, yeah I've had a couple of near misses on the bicycle.
And nearly hit a cyclist on a roundabout myself last year.

I know I will give up riding on the road eventually. As I get older, I'll have to let it go.

I am very conscious that it is a high risk thing to be doing. even if I don't get knocked by a vehicle, I could still be made a paraplegic if a front wheel buckles.

And I am even more aware of the risk knowing the full spectrum of people's special senses (vision, hearing, reflexes, coordination) and impulse control or lack thereof. The lower 50% make you truly wonder why there's not more accidents.

BC, I second TPFKAD. Get in touch with him......he may give you a serve, but deep inside he'll eventually realize you wouldn't track him down out of disingenuity.
 
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